Archive for the ‘daniela-blog’ Category

// MASH UP // EUROPEAN MEDIA ART FESTIVAL OSNABRUECK

January 27th, 2010 by Daniela Reimann

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The EUROPEAN MEDIA ART FESTIVAL OSNABRUECK will take place over 21 – 25 April 2010 (the exhibition will be held over 21 April – 24 May 2010). Unfortunately there is an overlap with the ARTECH 2010 conference on digital arts to be held over 22-23 April in Guimarães, Portugal. However, here is the information about the festival 2010:

“The 23rd European Media Art Festival arouses great international interest. Once again, there is a great deal of international interest in this year’s Media Art Festival in Osnabrück. Over 2100 artists from every corner of the globe have sent in films, videos and installations. The entries were sent from countries such as Mexico, South Korea, Australia, Canada, the Netherlands and France. Entries were received from a total of 60 different countries, whereby Germany, the USA and Great Britain are most strongly represented. However, there are also works from Afghanistan, Palestine and the Arab Emirates, as well as from Russia, the Czech Republic and Argentina.

This year, the European Media Art Festival (EMAF) is co-operating at the national level with Ruhr.2010, as part of the “National Heroes – German Cities of Culture” programme. This project was devised to integrate the cities that competed against one another nationally for the title of the European Capital of Culture. In other words, the former rivals have now become partners which, as a co-operation of cities, are engaging in the programme of the Capital of Culture RUHR.2010.

The festival also maintains good contacts to other European countries. For instance, an additional new award will be presented at this year’s EMAF: the “Live2011.com Grand Prix Event Award @ EMAF 2010″. This
award, which is worth 1500 euros, is part of the overall competition “Live2011.com Grand Prix”, announced by the European City of Culture 2011, Turku in Finland.

Another national co-operative project is currently in the decisive phase: MEDIA ART BASE. In collaboration with the documenta archive in Kassel and the Centre for Art and Media Karlsruhe, an online database for archiving major international media art works will be completed by 2011. This project receives major funding from the German Federal Cultural Foundation.

In addition, the EMAF has gained membership to two European support networks, both of which are used by the EU to support the production of artistic projects via its cultural programme. On the initiative of the EMAF, a new multimedia artwork by the internationally renowned artist Candice Breitz is facilitated with the MOVING STORIES project.
Also, the EMAF heads the co-operation TRANSIT, in which art institutions from Germany, France, Belgium, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Lithuania collaborate. Within TRANSIT, young talented artists hope to create and present their new works by 2011, and to exhibit them in Osnabrück.”

Please join us at: facebook, twitter, flickr, vimeo.

Concept and directors board: Hermann Nöring, Alfred Rotert, Ralf Sausmikat

// SPONSORS
nordmedia – Die Mediengesellschaft Niedersachsen/Bremen mbH
Stadt Osnabrueck
Auswaertiges Amt, Berlin
Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, Berlin
EU Funding EFRE
as well as donations from further sponsors.

Contact/Address/Postal:

European Media Art Festival
Lohstrasse 45 a,
D-49074 Osnabrueck

phone +49 (0) 5 41 – 2 16 58,
fax +49 (0) 5 41 – 2 83 27,
mail: info(at)emaf.de
www.emaf.de

via EMAF

The Universe Resounds: Kandinsky, Synesthesia, and Art Symposium

January 6th, 2010 by Daniela Reimann

Kandinsky

I ran across this interdisciplinary symposium disseminated via Yasmin:

The Universe Resounds: Kandinsky, Synesthesia, and Art Symposium
Tuesday, January 12, 2010
2–7 pm

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Peter B. Lewis Theater
1071 Fifth Avenue
(entrance on 88th Street)
New York City

http://www.guggenheim.org/universe-resounds

In conjunction with the final days of the Kandinsky exhibition on view through January 13, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is pleased to announce The Universe Resounds: Kandinsky, Synesthesia, and Art, an
interdisciplinary examination of painting, synesthesia, and abstraction from modern to contemporary times, including from the perspectives of art history, neuroscience, music, film, physics, and performance. A reception and exhibition viewing follows the symposium.

Topics and Speakers

Kandinsky’s Synesthetic Vision: Color/Sound/Word/Image
Magdalena Dabrowski, Special Consultant, Department of
Nineteenth-Century, Modern, and Contemporary Art, Metropolitan Museum
of Art, New York

Notes on Kandinsky and Schönberg
James Leggio, Head of Publications, Brooklyn Museum, New York

Kandinsky’s Legacy in Film and Popular Culture
Kerry Brougher, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.

Nonobjective Films
Courtesy the Center for Visual Music, Los Angeles

Neuroscience and Music
David Soldier, Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Pharmacology, Columbia University Medical School, New York, with Brad Garton, Director of the Columbia Computer Music Studio, Columbia University,
New York

Hypermusic Prologue
Matthew Ritchie, artist, New York

Moderated Discussion
Caroline Jones, Professor of Art History and Director, History Theory Criticism Section, Department of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston

For complete information, schedule, and tickets check online or call
the Box Office at 212 423 3587, Mon–Fri, 1–5 pm.

Eyetracking Forum
Wednesday, January 13, 2010
9 am
Martin Segal Theatre
The City University of New York Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue (at 34th Street)
New York City

Science & the Arts at the CUNY Graduate Center and the Sackler Center for Arts Education are pleased to announce an Eyetracking Forum. This session for art and science professionals examines the science of
eyetracking from multiple perspectives, including filmmaking, interface technology, psychology, and data visualization, and concludes with an exhibition walkthrough.

Moderators: Adrienne Klein and Grahame Weinbren

Space is limited, RSVP required: publicprograms@guggenheim.org

Participants

Kenneth J. Ciuffreda, O.D., Ph.D., is the former Chairman of the Department of Vision Sciences at SUNY State College of Optometry, New York, whose current research involves normal and abnormal oculomotor
systems.

Isaac Dimitrovsky is a programmer who lives and works in New York.

Rebecca Shulman Herz is Senior Education Manager of the Learning Through Art program at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and author of Looking at Art in the Classroom: Art Investigations from the
Guggenheim Museum (Teachers College Press, 2010).

Bruce Homer is Associate Professor for the Ph.D. Program in Educational Psychology at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Adrienne Klein is Co-Director of Science & the Arts at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Ken Perlin is Professor of Computer Science at New York University, directing the NYU Games for Learning Institute.

John F. Simon, Jr. is a practicing new media artist who works with LCD screens and computer programming.

Paula Stuttman is an artist, independent art lecturer, and part-time Assistant Professor at the New School, New York.

Grahame Weinbren is an interactive filmmaker whose work is represented in the permanent collection of the Guggenheim Museum; he is also a member of the graduate faculty of the School of Visual Arts, New York.

George A. Zikos, O.D., M.S., directs the Manhattan Vision Associates/Institute Vision Research, New York.

via Yasmin, image via http://www.guggenheim.org

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