Archive for the ‘daniela-blog’ Category

Skills for the creative industries – Virtual conference on UNESCO-UNEVOC’s online forum

September 29th, 2014 by Daniela Reimann

“Skills for the creative industries” is a virtual conference on UNESCO-UNEVOC’s online forum: http://en.unesco.org/events/skills-creative-industries-virtual-conference-unesco-unevocs-online-forum:

“In the next edition of UNESCO-UNEVOC’s virtual conferences, we will discuss the role of skills in the creative industries. The virtual conference will be moderated by Paul Collard, CEO of Creativity, Culture and Education (CCE), an international foundation dedicated to unlocking the creativity of children and young people in and out of formal education, based in Nottingham, United Kingdom. The conference will take place from 29 September to 10 October 2014 on UNESCO-UNEVOC’s e-Forum.

UNESCO’s 2013 Creative Economy Report refers to jobs in the creative industries as “activities involving cultural creativity and/or innovation”. The creative industries are recognized by UNESCO as a powerful source for “new development pathways that encourage creativity and innovation in the pursuit of inclusive, equitable and sustainable growth and development.”

The virtual conference will address the following questions:

• What are creative industries and what are the needs for skills?
• How can we turn the expansion of creative economies into an advantage for TVET and, in turn, what can TVET and skills development do to support the growth of the creative sector?
• What is the role of creativity in TVET?
• What are the different vocational pathways to creative jobs?
• What do we know about the creative industries and what do we still need to learn?

When, local time:
Monday, 29 September 2014 – 9:00am to Friday, 10 October 2014 – 5:00pm
Where:
Bonn
Type of Event:
Working group/Expert Meeting
Contact:
Alix Wurdak, a.wurdak@unesco.org +49 228 8150108

via UNESCO
http://en.unesco.org/events/skills-creative-industries-virtual-conference-unesco-unevocs-online-forum

LOGO UNESCO unevocs

  • Search Pontydysgu.org

    News Bites

    Zero Hours Contracts

    Figures from the UK Higher Education Statistics Agency show that in total almost 11,500 people – both academics and support staff – working in universities on a standard basis were on a zero-hours contract in 2017-18, out of a total staff head count of about 430,000, reports the Times Higher Education.  Zero-hours contract means the employer is not obliged to provide any minimum working hours

    Separate figures that only look at the number of people who are employed on “atypical” academic contracts (such as people working on projects) show that 23 per cent of them, or just over 16,000, had a zero-hours contract.


    Resistance decreases over time

    Interesting research on student centered learning and student buy in, as picked up by an article in Inside Higher Ed. A new study published in PLOS ONE, called “Knowing Is Half the Battle: Assessments of Both Student Perception and Performance Are Necessary to Successfully Evaluate Curricular Transformation finds that student resistance to curriculum innovation decreases over time as it becomes the institutional norm, and that students increasingly link active learning to their learning gains over time


    Postgrad pressure

    Research published this year by Vitae and the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) and reported by the Guardian highlights the pressure on post graduate students.

    “They might suffer anxiety about whether they deserve their place at university,” says Sally Wilson, who led IES’s contribution to the research. “Postgraduates can feel as though they are in a vacuum. They don’t know how to structure their time. Many felt they didn’t get support from their supervisor.”

    Taught students tend to fare better than researchers – they enjoy more structure and contact, says Sian Duffin, student support manager at Arden University. But she believes anxiety is on the rise. “The pressure to gain distinction grades is immense,” she says. “Fear of failure can lead to perfectionism, anxiety and depression.”


    Teenagers online in the USA

    According to Pew Internet 95% of teenagers in the USA now report they have a smartphone or access to one. These mobile connections are in turn fueling more-persistent online activities: 45% of teens now say they are online on a near-constant basis.

    Roughly half (51%) of 13 to 17 year olds say they use Facebook, notably lower than the shares who use YouTube, Instagram or Snapchat.

    The survey also finds there is no clear consensus among teens about the effect that social media has on the lives of young people today. Minorities of teens describe that effect as mostly positive (31%) or mostly negative (24%), but the largest share (45%) says that effect has been neither positive nor negative.


    Other Pontydysgu Spaces

    • Pontydysgu on the Web

      pbwiki
      Our Wikispace for teaching and learning
      Sounds of the Bazaar Radio LIVE
      Join our Sounds of the Bazaar Facebook goup. Just click on the logo above.

      We will be at Online Educa Berlin 2015. See the info above. The stream URL to play in your application is Stream URL or go to our new stream webpage here SoB Stream Page.

  • Twitter

    @mimirinis thanks Mike - looks interesting

    About 3 hours ago from Graham Attwell's Twitter via Tweetbot for Mac

  • RT @FCChristie Interested in careers research? Then please join us. Excellent programme of speakers and workshops! Speakers including @rhordosy @ScurryTracy @pigironjoe @CiaranBurkeSoc twitter.com/agcas/status/1…

    About 5 days ago from Cristina Costa's Twitter via Twitter for Android

  • Sounds of the Bazaar AudioBoo

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • Meta

  • Upcoming Events

      There are no events.
  • Categories