Archive for the ‘Wales Wide Web’ Category

Learning Analytics for Workplace and Professional Learning

December 10th, 2015 by Graham Attwell

Whilst there has been much interest from the Technology Enhanced Learning research and development community in Learning Analytics  (LA) , most of the focus has been on formal learning in educational institutions. There has been relatively little written about work based learning and continuing professional development, let alone informal learning. And what evidence there is suggests that Learning Analytics applied to informal and work based learning may require a significantly different approach to the emerging mainstream LA for schools and universities. Amongst other issues, data sets may be significantly smaller, learners are less concerned about completing learning in a set time to well defined assessment metrics and may have significant concerns about data privacy. Perhaps most significantly the answers we are trying to find out about learning in the workplace may not be the same as within an educational institution.

For this reason it is very good to see the organisation of a Learning Analytics for Workplace and Professional Learning (LA for Work) workshop collocated with the
Learning Analytics and Knowledge Conference (LAK 2016) at University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK, being held in April 2016. Below is the Call for Papers.

Learning Analytics have been striving in the past years for all types of educational settings. However, analytics for workplace learning has been much less in the focus of the learning analytics community. While Learning Analytics in educational settings very often follow a particular pedagogical design, workplace learning is much more driven
by demands of work tasks or intrinsic interests of the learner, by self-directed exploration and social exchange that is tightly connected to processes and the places of work. Hence, learning interactions at the workplace are to a large extent informal and not embedded into a pedagogical scenario. At the same time, workplace learners can benefit from being exposed to their own and other’s learning processes and outcomes as this potentially allows for better awareness and tracing of learning, sharing experiences, and scaling
informal learning practices.

Recently, several different approaches to Learning Analytics in the workplace have been suggested. Some of these have been coming from the tradition of adaptive learning systems or self-directed learning environments for workplace learning or lifelong learning, some from learning in professional communities. Recently, the topic of
performance analytics or analytics in smart industries has extended the focus to more traditional work settings. New research challenges also abound in workplace scenarios, such as the introduction of new technologies (augmented interfaces, large scale collaboration platforms), or the new challenges that derive from the need to make
informal learning processes better traceable and recognizable.

We consider that workplace learning scenarios can benefit from existing research in education-based Learning Analytics approaches and technologies. At the same time, we are convinced that the community would benefit from a closer exchange around the specificities of workplace learning, such as the unconstrained and less plannable
learning processes, the challenge to integrate learning systems in work practices, or a methodological focus on design-oriented research approaches with smaller samples in real life settings. At the same time, we think that researchers in the educational domain can benefit from this workshop at LAK, as the clear boundaries between formal and
informal learning are increasingly vanishing, and a focus on lifelong learning is increasingly being established. For this reason, the LA for Work workshop aims at providing a forum for researchers and practitioners who are making innovative use of analytics at the workplace, and for those who have an interest in exploring analytics
in more informal learning settings.

Objectives and Topics

The objective of this workshop is to provide a forum for researchers in the area of learning analytics who specifically address learning at the workplace or in professional settings in different forms and flavors. We will welcome high-quality papers about actual trends related to workplace Learning Analytics. We will seek application oriented, as well as more theoretical papers and position papers in the following, non-exhaustive list of topics:

Learning Analytics for informal learning
Learning Analytics for the integration of formal and informal learning
Learning Analytics for workplace performance
Learning Analytics for lifelong learning
Community-Based Learning Analytics
Learning Analytics for Organisational Learning
Learning Analytics in professional communities
Workplace learning awareness, measurement and certification
Analytics for different educational processes at or near the
workplace, such as problem-based learning, on-the-job training,
self-directed informal learning, collaborative learning
Knowledge maturing in communities of practice, organisations or networks
Data-driven interventions to improve learning processes at the workplace
Recomendations of learning artifacts or learning activities at the workplace

DATES & SUBMISSION

We welcome the following types of contributions:

Short research papers and position papers (up to 4 pages)

Full research papers (up to 6 pages)

All submissions must be written in English and must be formatted according to the ACM format. Please, submit your contributions electronically in PDF format via
https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=laforwork2016

Who wants to be a teacher

December 10th, 2015 by Graham Attwell

From OECD:

PISA in Focus shows, in many countries the teaching profession is having a hard time making itself an attractive career choice – particularly among boys and among the highest-performing students.

PISA 2006 asked students from the 60 participating countries and economies what occupation they expected to be working in when they are 30 years old. Some 44% of 15-year-olds in OECD countries reported that they expect to work in high-status occupations that generally require a university degree; but only 5% of those students reported that they expect to work as teachers, one of those professional careers.

The numbers are even more revealing when considering the profile of the students who reported that they expect to work as teachers. If you read our report on gender equality in education published earlier this year, you may remember that girls tend to favour “nurturance-oriented” careers more than boys do – and teaching is one of those careers. In almost every OECD country, more girls (6%) than boys (3%) reported that they expect to work as teachers. This statistic is particularly worrying when you recall that the majority of overall low achievers in school are boys, who could benefit from the presence of more male role models at school.

Sounds of the Bazaar – LIVE from OEB15 Day 2

December 7th, 2015 by Dirk Stieglitz

Here is the podcast of our second live programme from OEB15. Our guest on the Friday were:

  • John Bibby – Learning Layers
  • Hani Malouf – Velawoods English
  • Yishay Mor – MOOCs and Co, Spain
  • Jane Richardson – Oracle Academy, UK
  • Inge De Waard – Open University, UK
  • ADInstruments Ltd -Tom Broughton (exhibition stand)
  • Entropy Knowledge Network – Rubina  Antonelli (exhibition stand)
  • Ilona Buchem –  Beuth Hochschule für Technik Berlin, Germany

The show was presented by Graham Attwell, Jenny Hughes and Chahira Nouira. The music is by Boom Boom Beckett from the Album “boom boom baby” and you can find it on Jamendo.com.

Sounds of the Bazaar – LIVE from OEB15 Day 1

December 4th, 2015 by Graham Attwell

We were again with our Sounds of the Bazaar radio stand at the OEB-Conference and broadcasted two programms. Here is the first show we recorded live on Thursday the 3rd of December. On the show were in chronological order:

  • Paul Bailey – Jisc, UK
  • June Breivik – Norwegian Business School
  • Peter Isackson – SkillScaper, USA and Learnscaper, France
  • Nick Kearny –  Boundaries Observatory C.I.C., UK
  • Melanie Campbell (Bau-ABC Rostrup, Germany) and Raymond Elferink (RayCom, Netherlands)
  • Norbert Morawetz and Clayton Black  –  Potential.ly, UK
  • Volker Lichtenthäler – Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
  • Philipp Hoellermann – International Hochschule Bad Honnef, Bonn

As presenters we have had Graham Attwell, Jenny Hughes, Jaanika Hirv and Chahira Nouira. The music is by Gustavo Crochenci and you can find his music on Jamendo.com.

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