Getting back to normal business …

March 26th, 2019 by Pekka Kamarainen

The start of this year has been far from normal to me. At the end of January I had a complete computer crash. It took quite some time to get it repaired. I was working with a replacement computer (not with the same operating system, not with the same permissions to access Internet, not having my usual entries to password-protected websites, not with the usual e-mail program etc. etc.).

And when I got my repaired computer back, I had quite an effort catch up with the pending work. No time for blogging, not so easy to share thoughts via blogs, when the clock is ticking.

Now I hope that I have got myself over the worst. So, I will try to start using the blog as I have been using it during several years. I will share thoughts on the projects in/with which I am working. And I will put ‘work in progress’ into discussion. Final reports are matters of their own, discussion documents are there to be discussed.

And perhaps I will have a moment or two to look beyond the immediate contexts of work. After all – there is life outside the projects. And – to keep oneself fit for working and learning, you have to have capacity for life as a wider context of learning.

More blogs to come …

Zimmererblog is going on strong – Learning Layers’ multimedia training bears fruit

June 12th, 2016 by Pekka Kamarainen

In my latest blogs I have given progress reports on the construction pilot of our EU-funded Learning Layers (LL) project, mostly focusing on the integrative toolset Learning Toolbox (LTB). In addition I have provided a review on the progress we have achieved since the project consortium meeting in Tallinn one year ago. In this blog I will have a look at the main results of the earlier Multimedia Training Workshops (that the LL project organised for the full-time trainers (Lehrwerkmeister) of the construction sector training centre Bau-ABC in 2013-2014) – the trainers’ blogs. Here I will firstly focus on the most outstanding example, the Zimmererblog (Carpenters’ blog) of Bau-ABC trainer Markus Pape.

Zimmererblog – origins, development and impact

In the first Multimedia Training Workshops of the LL project in the years 2013-2014 the LL partners from Pontydysgu and ITB providedtraining for a group of voluntary Bau-ABC trainers. At that time we started by getting an overview of the general web tools and by making use of them. In this context the participating trainers created their own WordPress blogs. In the course of the training they developed their own pattern of working with blogs. Instead of keeping a diary or writing columns on different topics the trainers have transformed their blogs into their own ‘open educational resources’. In this process the trainer Markus Pape has been the pioneer and his Zimmererblog has become the most comprehensive one.

Looking at the structure – after the startpage – the main areas of the blog are the collections of project descriptions (worksheets) for each year of apprentice training. Then, the blog provides links to literature and other websites as well as an additional area for special techniques. Yet, the special trademark of this blog is that the pictures in the worksheets, in the special area and in the slideshow have been edited to make the site more attractive.

Looking at the impact, it is worthwhile to note that the Zimmererblog has from the very beginning on gained a wide popularity beyond the primary users – trainers and apprentices in Bau-ABC. The statistics reveal that it has been viewed from all over the world – although it is only available in German. Recently it has reached the milestone of 45.000 hits (the exact number being currently 45.103) and the interest is not dropping at all. In this respect the expression ‘open educational resource’ is justified.

Trainers’ blogs in the neighboring trades have also taken their place

Parallel to the Zimmererblog the trainers in some other trades (who had also attended the Multimedia Training Workshops) started to create similar blogs for their trades (or groups of trades). As a result there are three other blogs with similar structure in Bau-ABC:

  • The ‘Maurerblog’ (“Mauerwerksbau im Bau-ABC Rostrup. Backsteine und Mehr”) provides a similar set of learning resources for bricklayer apprentices and additional resources for skilled workers. Currently this site has reached 6.604 hits.
  • The ‘Tiefbaublog’ (“Tiefbau Bau-ABC Rostrup. Mach Dich schlau im Tiefbau”) provides a similar set of resources for three neighbouring trades – road-builders (Strassenbauer), pipeline-builders (Rohrleitungsbauer) and sewage-builders (Kanalbauer). In a similar way it provides additional info sheets and links to external resorces. Currently this site has reached 2.893 hits.
  • The ‘Brunnenbaublog’ (Brunnenbauer und Spezialtiefbauer) provides similar sets of resources for the neighbouring trades of well-builders (Brunnebauer) and for the tunnel-builders (Spezialtiefbauer). In addition, the blog provides further links to progression routes to higher education/qualifications (Duales Studium, Weiterbildung). In addition, the blog provides further sections for special themes, tables and instructions for health and safety. For this site we have not got the current statistics.

Here it is worthwhile to note that these blogs have been developed mainly for internal use in Bau-ABC. From that perspective they have been used rather well although their external impact has remained rather limited compared with the Zimmererblog and its impressive outreach.

– – –

Altogether the trainers’ blogs have already taken their place before the Learning Toolbox has been introduced. Now it is interesting to see, how these tools and instruments can best complement each other. Already in the ‘Theme Room” training workshops the trainers started developing thoughts in this respect. I am looking forward to the next steps.

More blogs to come …

 

The Universe Resounds: Kandinsky, Synesthesia, and Art Symposium

January 6th, 2010 by Daniela Reimann

Kandinsky

I ran across this interdisciplinary symposium disseminated via Yasmin:

The Universe Resounds: Kandinsky, Synesthesia, and Art Symposium
Tuesday, January 12, 2010
2–7 pm

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Peter B. Lewis Theater
1071 Fifth Avenue
(entrance on 88th Street)
New York City

http://www.guggenheim.org/universe-resounds

In conjunction with the final days of the Kandinsky exhibition on view through January 13, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is pleased to announce The Universe Resounds: Kandinsky, Synesthesia, and Art, an
interdisciplinary examination of painting, synesthesia, and abstraction from modern to contemporary times, including from the perspectives of art history, neuroscience, music, film, physics, and performance. A reception and exhibition viewing follows the symposium.

Topics and Speakers

Kandinsky’s Synesthetic Vision: Color/Sound/Word/Image
Magdalena Dabrowski, Special Consultant, Department of
Nineteenth-Century, Modern, and Contemporary Art, Metropolitan Museum
of Art, New York

Notes on Kandinsky and Schönberg
James Leggio, Head of Publications, Brooklyn Museum, New York

Kandinsky’s Legacy in Film and Popular Culture
Kerry Brougher, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.

Nonobjective Films
Courtesy the Center for Visual Music, Los Angeles

Neuroscience and Music
David Soldier, Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Pharmacology, Columbia University Medical School, New York, with Brad Garton, Director of the Columbia Computer Music Studio, Columbia University,
New York

Hypermusic Prologue
Matthew Ritchie, artist, New York

Moderated Discussion
Caroline Jones, Professor of Art History and Director, History Theory Criticism Section, Department of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston

For complete information, schedule, and tickets check online or call
the Box Office at 212 423 3587, Mon–Fri, 1–5 pm.

Eyetracking Forum
Wednesday, January 13, 2010
9 am
Martin Segal Theatre
The City University of New York Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue (at 34th Street)
New York City

Science & the Arts at the CUNY Graduate Center and the Sackler Center for Arts Education are pleased to announce an Eyetracking Forum. This session for art and science professionals examines the science of
eyetracking from multiple perspectives, including filmmaking, interface technology, psychology, and data visualization, and concludes with an exhibition walkthrough.

Moderators: Adrienne Klein and Grahame Weinbren

Space is limited, RSVP required: publicprograms@guggenheim.org

Participants

Kenneth J. Ciuffreda, O.D., Ph.D., is the former Chairman of the Department of Vision Sciences at SUNY State College of Optometry, New York, whose current research involves normal and abnormal oculomotor
systems.

Isaac Dimitrovsky is a programmer who lives and works in New York.

Rebecca Shulman Herz is Senior Education Manager of the Learning Through Art program at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and author of Looking at Art in the Classroom: Art Investigations from the
Guggenheim Museum (Teachers College Press, 2010).

Bruce Homer is Associate Professor for the Ph.D. Program in Educational Psychology at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Adrienne Klein is Co-Director of Science & the Arts at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Ken Perlin is Professor of Computer Science at New York University, directing the NYU Games for Learning Institute.

John F. Simon, Jr. is a practicing new media artist who works with LCD screens and computer programming.

Paula Stuttman is an artist, independent art lecturer, and part-time Assistant Professor at the New School, New York.

Grahame Weinbren is an interactive filmmaker whose work is represented in the permanent collection of the Guggenheim Museum; he is also a member of the graduate faculty of the School of Visual Arts, New York.

George A. Zikos, O.D., M.S., directs the Manhattan Vision Associates/Institute Vision Research, New York.

via Yasmin, image via http://www.guggenheim.org

Networkingart Blog Launch

October 6th, 2009 by Daniela Reimann

LOGO

Networkingart is a blog on activism, hacktivism and networking by Tatiana Bazzichelli, a.k.a. T_Bazz I came across in the context of hacking as an artistic strategy to be applied in media art education:

“It is the result and the evolution of an investigation in the field of hacktivism, networking and digital culture started in 1996 by Tatiana Bazzichelli, a.k.a. T_Bazz. Connecting hacker culture, experimental art and activism, Networkingart focuses on the activity of communities or individuals who create, act and write, exploring the unpredictable, the disruptive practice, the cultural ‘Trojan Horses’ – or better, social hacks – as a strategy for art. At the same time, it wants to reflect on the intersection between art and digital economy, focusing on the unpredictable as a business model, and a way to appropriate and creatively transform media and technology.

The art of networking embraces diverse practices and diverse media and technologies. And, most of all, diverse people. This blog is dedicated to them: to all the artists, hackers, free thinkers and open minds who
the author has had occasion to meet in the course of her investigation and those who will come next. It relates directly to the book ‘Networking. The Net as Artwork’ (Tatiana Bazzichelli, 2006; Eng. 2009), which describes the evolution of the Italian hacktivism and underground culture from the 1980s till today and which was an opportunity to share ideas, projects and strategies with hackers and activists from Italy and
Europe (mostly Middle and Northern Europe).

Networkingart starts in San Francisco, during a Visiting Scholarship of four months at Stanford University, in the context of a research about social networking, web 2.0 and art developed at Aarhus University, in
Denmark. Land of pranksters, artists and free thinkers, California is also land of exploration of new social and technological frontiers. This blog will evolve creating further connections and networks, both in the physical
and in the ‘virtual’ world.

Enjoy it!”

via the AHA list by T_Bazz

Loads of New Challenges!

May 1st, 2008 by Cristina Costa

Today is Labor day and it does seem that people have been working on ideas to keep us busy, busy, busy!

Or maybe it was the Spring which brought a new wave of imagination and creativity.

Be as it may, the fact is that the challenges are here and there is no way passionate people about education, the blogsphere or simply cyber-fans will ignore these two challenges that arrived to me through twitter

The Comment Challenge: From today on and for a period of one month (1st – 31st May) Sue Waters, Silvia Tolisano, Michele Martin and Kim Cofino are challenging you to be a better blog citizen. For more information link to the wiki.

Meanwhile, you can invite your students and/or gather inspiration while wandering around the blogsphere to apply to this mega cool contest: The Sparky Awards

What a shame I don’t have students right now, otherwise we would already be cooking up something for this challenge too. (the process is more fun than the prize itself. It is also a cool way to get the learners involved)

So, the question is: Are you up for the challenges? I really hope so.

If you still have some reservations, do listen to this video and read some of the comments that were stimulated by this master piece by blog experts! Isn’t this exciting! I am just thrilled!!!;-)

  • Search Pontydysgu.org

    Social Media




    News Bites

    Cyborg patented?

    Forbes reports that Microsoft has obtained a patent for a “conversational chatbot of a specific person” created from images, recordings, participation in social networks, emails, letters, etc., coupled with the possible generation of a 2D or 3D model of the person.


    Racial bias in algorithms

    From the UK Open Data Institute’s Week in Data newsletter

    This week, Twitter apologised for racial bias within its image-cropping algorithm. The feature is designed to automatically crop images to highlight focal points – including faces. But, Twitter users discovered that, in practice, white faces were focused on, and black faces were cropped out. And, Twitter isn’t the only platform struggling with its algorithm – YouTube has also announced plans to bring back higher levels of human moderation for removing content, after its AI-centred approach resulted in over-censorship, with videos being removed at far higher rates than with human moderators.


    Gap between rich and poor university students widest for 12 years

    Via The Canary.

    The gap between poor students and their more affluent peers attending university has widened to its largest point for 12 years, according to data published by the Department for Education (DfE).

    Better-off pupils are significantly more likely to go to university than their more disadvantaged peers. And the gap between the two groups – 18.8 percentage points – is the widest it’s been since 2006/07.

    The latest statistics show that 26.3% of pupils eligible for FSMs went on to university in 2018/19, compared with 45.1% of those who did not receive free meals. Only 12.7% of white British males who were eligible for FSMs went to university by the age of 19. The progression rate has fallen slightly for the first time since 2011/12, according to the DfE analysis.


    Quality Training

    From Raconteur. A recent report by global learning consultancy Kineo examined the learning intentions of 8,000 employees across 13 different industries. It found a huge gap between the quality of training offered and the needs of employees. Of those surveyed, 85 per cent said they , with only 16 per cent of employees finding the learning programmes offered by their employers effective.


    Other Pontydysgu Spaces

    • Pontydysgu on the Web

      pbwiki
      Our Wikispace for teaching and learning
      Sounds of the Bazaar Radio LIVE
      Join our Sounds of the Bazaar Facebook goup. Just click on the logo above.

      We will be at Online Educa Berlin 2015. See the info above. The stream URL to play in your application is Stream URL or go to our new stream webpage here SoB Stream Page.

  • Twitter

    The comparison (or contradiction) between performance and learning deserves more attention twitter.com/neilmosley5/st…

    About 14 hours ago from Graham Attwell's Twitter via Twitter for Mac

  • @CiaranBurkeSoc I ordered them all to the university's library this week so students will be invited to read them soon enough 🤭

    About 10 hours ago from Cristina Costa's Twitter via Twitter Web App

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • Meta

  • Categories