GoogleTranslate Service


Education and Twitter – the end of a beautiful affair

March 14th, 2011 by Graham Attwell

It is always sad when lovers break up. especially close lovers with a growing relationship who suddenly fall out with each other. And the educational technology community has certainly has a long love in with Twitter. Twitter for teaching, Twitter for learning, Twitter for developing projects, twitter for maintaining communities and twitter just for nattering with each other. But I foresee a more tempestuous relationship ahead. Why? As the Guardian newspaper reports: “Twitter has amazed and outraged developers by warning them that it will severely curtail their ability to build apps that use its output.” The Guardian quotes Ryan Sarver, the head of platform and API at Twitter as saying:

Twitter will provide the primary mainstream consumer client experience on phones, computers, and other devices by which millions of people access Twitter content (tweets, trends, profiles, etc), and send tweets. If there are too many ways to use Twitter that are inconsistent with one another, we risk diffusing the user experience.

It was just because Twitter opened up its API to third party developers and applications which led to such rapid innovation and experimentation – in education as much as elsewhere. This looks to be over. Sarver might claim this is due to the desire to guarantee the user experience but few will believe that. fairly obviously Twitter want to make money out of their loss making application.  I suspect it is not so much apps they want to make money out of but advertising. and to control advertising they want to control the app market.

As Dave Winer (who has seen all this a few times before) says: “The Internet remains the best place to develop because it is the Platform With No Platform Vendor.” Winer goes on to say:

Facebook may have a huge installed base, but it’s dead to me. I can’t get there. The platform vendor is too active. Same with Twitter, same with Apple. Give me a void, something I can develop for, where I can follow the idea where ever it leads. Maybe there are only a few thousand users. Maybe only a few million. Hey, you can’t be friends with everyone.

And that I guess is the lesson for education. Follow our ideas. See where they lead. Don’t worry about how many users there are. And above all lets work on the platform with no vendor. Education is a public good, not a vendor platform.

But it was good whilst it lasted, Twitter.

Please follow and like us:

7 Responses to “Education and Twitter – the end of a beautiful affair”

  1. Frances Bell says:

    Supplier lock-in is an old story – desired by suppliers and tolerated by lazy users/ purchasers. What is different in the Web 2.0 era is that is content rather than fees that are the price of supplier lock-in See http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B7P5S-4PKFGN7-9&_user=10&_coverDate=12%2F31%2F2007&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=gateway&_origin=gateway&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1678416004&_rerunOrigin=scholar.google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=4eeb0c7f9fa0e3cd4ac601e9c7a6e30e&searchtype=a “costs and network effects bind customers to vendors if products are incompatible, locking customers or even markets in to early choices.” Sounds familiar?

  2. Mark Power says:

    Hmm…services will change, become less and more attractive to users (and developers) and disappear completely, as we’ve seen over the last few years and the boom of the web.

    I’m not sure that education can, though, say “don’t worry about how many users there are”. Or to be more accurate…”don’t worry where the users are”, as that’s what education would *really* have to say if it was to turn away from vendor lock-in and suchlike.

    The learners are users. Users of Facebook, of Twitter, of Flickr and YouTube and Bebo and whatever the hell else is out there in the social networking ecosystem. Their learning and education is just a part of their life and that’s where their online life is. So, imho, education has to go to where the users are. And, yes, this means that it has to be flexible and adaptable to changing networks and services and tools. Working on the platform with no vendor sounds suspiciously like attempting to create something specific to education, or to the institution or to the course…hmmm….sounds suspiciously like a VLE to me 😉

    But anyway…this headline sounds to me like a precursor to a “Twitter is Dead” debate. What next? Why, Google’s Circles of course. I’ll betcha this time next year that will be the Big Thing in education. 🙂

Tweetbacks

  1. I hope not 🙁 RT @grahamattwell: New blog post ‘Education and Twitter – the end of a beautiful affair?’ http://is.gd/M38pnA

  2. Commented on this http://bit.ly/edYitB @GrahamAttwell:’Education and Twitter – end of a beautiful affair?’ http://is.gd/M38pnA

  3. Llegint: ‘Education and Twitter – the end of a beautiful affair’ http://is.gd/M38pnA

  • Search Pontydysgu.org

    Social Media




    News Bites

    Cyborg patented?

    Forbes reports that Microsoft has obtained a patent for a “conversational chatbot of a specific person” created from images, recordings, participation in social networks, emails, letters, etc., coupled with the possible generation of a 2D or 3D model of the person.

    Please follow and like us:


    Racial bias in algorithms

    From the UK Open Data Institute’s Week in Data newsletter

    This week, Twitter apologised for racial bias within its image-cropping algorithm. The feature is designed to automatically crop images to highlight focal points – including faces. But, Twitter users discovered that, in practice, white faces were focused on, and black faces were cropped out. And, Twitter isn’t the only platform struggling with its algorithm – YouTube has also announced plans to bring back higher levels of human moderation for removing content, after its AI-centred approach resulted in over-censorship, with videos being removed at far higher rates than with human moderators.

    Please follow and like us:


    Gap between rich and poor university students widest for 12 years

    Via The Canary.

    The gap between poor students and their more affluent peers attending university has widened to its largest point for 12 years, according to data published by the Department for Education (DfE).

    Better-off pupils are significantly more likely to go to university than their more disadvantaged peers. And the gap between the two groups – 18.8 percentage points – is the widest it’s been since 2006/07.

    The latest statistics show that 26.3% of pupils eligible for FSMs went on to university in 2018/19, compared with 45.1% of those who did not receive free meals. Only 12.7% of white British males who were eligible for FSMs went to university by the age of 19. The progression rate has fallen slightly for the first time since 2011/12, according to the DfE analysis.

    Please follow and like us:


    Quality Training

    From Raconteur. A recent report by global learning consultancy Kineo examined the learning intentions of 8,000 employees across 13 different industries. It found a huge gap between the quality of training offered and the needs of employees. Of those surveyed, 85 per cent said they , with only 16 per cent of employees finding the learning programmes offered by their employers effective.

    Please follow and like us:


    Other Pontydysgu Spaces

    • Pontydysgu on the Web

      pbwiki
      Our Wikispace for teaching and learning
      Sounds of the Bazaar Radio LIVE
      Join our Sounds of the Bazaar Facebook goup. Just click on the logo above.

      We will be at Online Educa Berlin 2015. See the info above. The stream URL to play in your application is Stream URL or go to our new stream webpage here SoB Stream Page.

      Please follow and like us:
  • Twitter

  • @tiagoemoreira But it doesn't make me less furious ... 😆

    About 3 days ago from Cristina Costa's Twitter via Twitter for Android

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • Meta

  • Categories