Introduction

    Speakers’ Corner

    June 1st, 2010 by Dirk Stieglitz

    Speakers’ Corner is a space for Pontydysgu associates and guest bloggers. It includes the following bloggers.

    Ana García Muñoz

    My name is Ana García Muñoz and I´m from Spain. I´m a Sociologist and I have worked, among others, in European projects in VET. My research interest include informal learning, the changing roles and competences of teachers and trainers with special attention to emergent profiles including acreditation models. In the blog I want to reflect the current Spanish situation in this field in reation with the European landscape.

    My Learning Journey

    Cristina Costa’s learning journey……..

    Jo’s Blog

    Jo Turner-Attwell is an intern at Pontydysgu who is discovering she has more to write in a blog than she originally thought.

    Ange’s Blog

    Angela Rees is a researcher and teacher based in Pontypridd in Wales. Her research intersets include e-learning, special education and learning difficulties and dyslexia.

    Daniela’s Blog

    Daniala Reimann’s blog on Media Arts Education focuses on interdisciplinary approaches in media, arts and education at school and university level.

    Dialogos

    Maria Perifanou has been working as an Italian language teacher for the last ten years and a researcher in the field of Applied Linguistics since 2002. She also works as an e-learning trainer for language teachers. She has participated in several European research summer and winter schools, workshops, conferences. She is also a member of different European research networks such as the TENCompetence Network and the Network of the European Technology of Enhanced Learning.

    User Design Blog

    This blog is written by Anuraj Dadhich. He is from Assam in India and is spending a summer internship with the University of Bremen and Pontydysgu. Anuraj is a student in Interaction Design.

    Speakers' Corner

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    Work Place Learning Space

    September 14th, 2016 by Angela Rees
    Graham asked me to do something fun which is unusual because *everyday* is fun at Pontydysgu. He asked for five photographs around learning spaces so I tried to capture the five most important aspects of my work based learning. My desk Complete with coffee, piles of unsorted paperwork, family photos, sharpies, MacBook, interweb, and most […]

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    What can Open Data do for public services?

    July 12th, 2016 by Angela Rees
    Originally posted on Good Practice Exchange at The Wales Audit Office:
    The Wales Audit Office is holding a Google Hangout on Open Data. It will look at how Open Data can help public services to deliver joined up, transparent and effective public services. In this blogpost, Dyfrig Williams looks at why the Good Practice Exchange is interested…

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    Very Hungry QR Caterpillars

    June 22nd, 2016 by Angela Rees
    The Taccle  project ran workshops at the National Digital Learning Event for Wales last week. One of the many ideas we presented for embedding ICT across the curriculum was using QR codes to enhance books. Here’s a link to download ready made codes for The Very Hungry Caterpillar Cut them out and stick them in […]

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    Charts and viral videos aside, this is why I’m voting IN.

    June 16th, 2016 by Angela Rees
    I joked about it six months ago, “if Brexit happens I’m out of a job”, happy in the knowledge that Britain is better off in Europe, that Wales is better off in Europe. I still believe that. For me there are no compelling reasons to leave, the least of which is ‘getting back control of […]

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    TACCLE 3: CODING

    August 13th, 2015 by Daniela Reimann

    TACCLE 3 Coding is a new research project which looks at Teachers’ Aids on Creating Content for Learning Environments in the field of coding. It is funded (from 9/2015 to 8/2017) under the European Commission’s Erasmus+ program, key action: Cooperation for innovation and the exchange of good practices.

    The project’s aims are:

    • To encourage and support teachers to introduce coding, programming and / or computational thinking as part of the curriculum in the 4 – 14 classroom to better equip pupils to develop the skills needed by the European labor market.
    • To broaden teachers’ digital skills base and enhance their professional competence
    • To show how entrepreneurial skills can be developed and integrated with programming skills The project objectives are:
    • To produce an on-line support package of ideas, activities, materials and downloadable resources for teachers who are teaching coding or programming or who want to.
    • To provide CPD courses in a variety of formats and a template and materials for local delivery.
    • To establish a dialogue between teachers and programmers, teachers and resource producers, teachers and organizations involved in teaching coding and to act as an agency for exchanges of curricula, ideas and practice.

    The demand for ICT professionals continues to grow. The European Commission estimates there will be 700, 000 unfilled vacancies for ICT practitioners in the EU by the year 2016. Of all job vacancies in ICT, computer programmers are the most in demand outnumbering the demand for other IT professionals by a factor of 5 to 1. The greatest demand is in UK, Germany, Estonia and other Northern European countries, which reflects the make up of the project partnership.

    Despite this skills shortage, there has been limited response from the European education system. Estonia has already introduced computer programming for all ages across the school curriculum, Denmark partially so. Others are about to introduce it (such as England in 2014) and others are considering it (e.g. Finland, Ireland). Some German Länder such as Bavaria are well advanced; others are not. In other countries, whilst not part of the compulsory curriculum, there are agencies and individual teachers who are trying to introduce programming into the classroom. What seems inevitable is that all member states must surely move in this direction if they are to meet the skills demands of the European economy. The biggest problem we face is a desperate shortage of teachers. Mathematics and computer-science graduates generally choose more lucrative trades; the humanities and social-science graduates who will find themselves teaching coding will need plenty of support as will the primary teachers. In addition the OECD reports that more and more computer programmers prefer to be self-employed or working in micro-SME partnerships and not committed to one particular long-term employer and the vacancy market is beginning to reflect the increase in a new form of employment in the ICT sector. For this reason the project is looking to produce resources for developing entrepreneurship skills alongside programming skills.

    The project will:

    · Develop a website of activities and ideas that teachers can use in the classroom to teach children about coding and programming. These will support diverse curricula across member states and, where there is no formal curriculum, support individual schools and teachers who want to introduce computing / informatics / programming etc. in their own practice
    · Develop some affordable resource kits that can be downloaded or for which instructions for making them can be provided on-line. This could result in selling the resource kits after the project as part of the exploitation and sustainability.
    · Design and pilot some staff development opportunities and learning resources for teachers who are total newcomers to programming.
    · Stimulate a positive attitude towards STEM with young children
    · Test and evaluate existing resources such as the range of software currently available to help children develop programming skills.
    · Explore and follow up existing research and projects addressing this issue (e.g. work on Tangible User Interface for children.)
    · Enter into policy dialogue and inform policy in countries around issues concerning the teaching and learning of programming in schools” (source: project proposal).

    Co-ordinator: Jens Vermeersch, adjunct van de directeur, GO! Onderwijs van de Vlaamse Gemeenschap, afdeling Beleid & Strategie, Internationalisation, Brussels

    Project partners:
    IBP/KIT, Germany
    Pontydysgu, Wales, U.K.,
    SGR Antigon Schoöengroep 1, Antwerpen, Belgium
    HITSA HariDUE INFOTHHNOLOGIA SIHTASUTUS, Research centre, Tallinn, Estonia
    TALLINN University, Tallinn, Estonia
    UNIVERSiDAD DE SALAMANCA, Spain
    AALTO UNIVERSITY, Helsinki, Finland
    University of Eastern Finland, School of Computing, KUOPIO, Finland

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    #blimage

    July 27th, 2015 by Angela Rees
    Curiosity got the better of me and I had to find out what the #blimage was going on in my Twitter feed. Turns out there’s some viral edu-blogging going on. Give someone a picture and challenge them to turn it into a learning related post. This youtube video from the originator @AmyBurvall explains it nicely. […]

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    Wales National Digital Learning Event 2015

    July 15th, 2015 by Angela Rees
    Jen and I went along to the National Digital Learning Event and Awards in Cardiff earlier in June. We handed out Taccle books and went to some workshops. There were a few to choose from but I attended a technocamps session which explored some ways of teaching computer science using lego bricks, (build a simple lego structure, now explain to your partner how to build an identical structure without them seeing what you have built) using people, (direct your person around the room using simple commands) and using Cargo Bot. I like what technocamps do, kit like Lego Mindstorms is pretty expensive, so they take the kit around to secondary schools and colleges across Wales for one day workshops. For lots of ideas about how to teach computing, coding and programming for the rest of the year you could check out the Taccle2 blog and the Babitech page. In the afternoon I had fun playing with Sonic Pi , which uses code for composing and performing music, you can see me in the video below (just after the 2 minute mark) getting flustered because there was a mistake in my loop. Don't let that put you off, it was really good fun and a great way to get instant and useful results form your code. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRq1W7ffdDE?rel=0] The best thing about the day was seeing the great things being done across Wales with Ponty locals Big Click scooping the Commercial Digital Project Award [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRVhWD9sjkY?rel=0] You can see all of the other inspirational kids and teachers getting their tech on at the Hwb website with projects like e-safety, coding with minecraft, creating an interactive local map and staging a robot wars competition. Keep an eye out for next years entries, Welsh kids are good with technology, the competition should be tough!

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    On the BabiTech iPhone

    July 15th, 2015 by Angela Rees
    Originally posted on Babi Tech:
    I’m sure you’re all dying to know which apps made it to the current BabiTech list. If there’s something missing that Babis 1 and 2 really need to have, stick it in the comments and we’ll try it out. Toca Boca Toca Boca’s Hair Xmas, Toca Builders, Toca Band, Toca…

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    London Tech Week 2015

    July 1st, 2015 by Angela Rees
    I had a pretty exciting and busy couple of days in London during their annual technology week. Straight off the train I met Vini from Quizalize which is hands down the best online quiz creator for educators I have used yet with the added bonus feature of live feedback. I don’t think they are embeddable but […]

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    Fundraising Guide

    March 13th, 2015 by Angela Rees

    The RadioActive project has produced a Funding Guide with lots of great ideas to raise money to get your internet radio show up and running.

    We’re not saying you’ll need the money but it’s always nice to have a helping hand with the overheads and new equipment.

    Check it out here

    crowdfund1


    Filed under: RadioActive

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