Introduction

    Speakers’ Corner

    June 1st, 2010 by Dirk Stieglitz

    Speakers’ Corner is a space for Pontydysgu associates and guest bloggers. It includes the following bloggers.

    Ana García Muñoz

    My name is Ana García Muñoz and I´m from Spain. I´m a Sociologist and I have worked, among others, in European projects in VET. My research interest include informal learning, the changing roles and competences of teachers and trainers with special attention to emergent profiles including acreditation models. In the blog I want to reflect the current Spanish situation in this field in reation with the European landscape.

    My Learning Journey

    Cristina Costa’s learning journey……..

    Jo’s Blog

    Jo Turner-Attwell is an intern at Pontydysgu who is discovering she has more to write in a blog than she originally thought.

    Ange’s Blog

    Angela Rees is a researcher and teacher based in Pontypridd in Wales. Her research intersets include e-learning, special education and learning difficulties and dyslexia.

    Daniela’s Blog

    Daniala Reimann’s blog on Media Arts Education focuses on interdisciplinary approaches in media, arts and education at school and university level.

    Dialogos

    Maria Perifanou has been working as an Italian language teacher for the last ten years and a researcher in the field of Applied Linguistics since 2002. She also works as an e-learning trainer for language teachers. She has participated in several European research summer and winter schools, workshops, conferences. She is also a member of different European research networks such as the TENCompetence Network and the Network of the European Technology of Enhanced Learning.

    User Design Blog

    This blog is written by Anuraj Dadhich. He is from Assam in India and is spending a summer internship with the University of Bremen and Pontydysgu. Anuraj is a student in Interaction Design.

    Speakers' Corner

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    Beyond Bulimic Learning Improving teaching in further education

    March 15th, 2014 by Cristina Costa

    Beyond Bulimic Learning Improving teaching in further education – Frank Coffield with Cristina Costa,Walter Müller and John Webber

    So here is a new adventure. Last year Frank Coffield asked me if I’d be interested in submitting a book chapter for his new book as he felt he was missing a trick for not including a chapter on technology. I wrote an article on designing for context, using examples from my own practice to illustrate the points I wanted to make. The result was a text entitled Teaching and learning in context … with a little help from the web (slides for a presentation based on it can be found here)

    The Book will be released in May. The launch will take place in the bookshop on the first level of the Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London, WC1H OAL on Wednesday 7 May between 6 and 8pm.

    * seeing my name in print never ceases to surprise me! :-)

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    Mooching around MOOCs

    March 4th, 2014 by Angela Rees

    I’ve been researching MOOCs by joining and participating in a few. I’m sure you don’t quite get the whole MOOC experience unless you’re signing up for something you’re genuinely interested in and with hindsight I was never going to get on well with Citizenship and US Immigration.  However, I had high hopes for the Anatomy of the Abdomen, (I once took an Anat. and Phys. subsidiary class) the discussion in the forums was good and there was lots of interaction with the lecturer, but I just couldn’t get through the videos.  I looked for more; an introduction to clinical neuropsychlogy, understanding the economy, basic dentistry… MOOC after MOOC of watch the video, answer the questions.  By video I mean 15 minutes of lecturer talking to the camera.

    I want to be inspired and I want to go and find things out for myself.

    That said, I do like the look and feel of FutureLearn, there is a discussion forum and comments function, you don’t have to follow the formula.

    Some good MOOCs;

    http://octel.alt.ac.uk WordPress based course by ALT in using technology in teaching and how to make a MOOC

    FSLT14 http://vle.openbrookes.net/course/view.php?id=11 Oxford Brooks Moodle based Mooc First steps in teaching and learning – activity based, so if you don’t participate in the blogging, discussing and collaborative document making you don’t learn anything. You can earn open badges for completing the activities.

    TOOC14 (Teaching Open Online Course) begins 10th March http://vle.openbrookes.net/course/view.php?id=12

    OOE13 http://www.ooe13.org another WordPress blog, lots of inspiration to go and do something and to embed it in your practice (in this case teaching) Uses Credly for awarding open badges. Course runs for a whole year rather than in short sessions of 2 or 3 weeks. Lots of related networking and peer to peer sharing and discussion via Twitter also assignments shared via Twitter.

    Interesting reading;

    I found this blog post  http://degreeoffreedom.org/xmooc-vs-cmooc/ on http://degreeoffreedom.org who is attempting to complete a four year BA in one year through the medium of MOOC.

    Great interactive learning ideas I saw today;

    Using a Google document to collate a collaborative annotated bibliography by inviting collaborators to use the comments feature to discuss/reflect on the contributions. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1I_ZO2KmbbJbzVLukxfVV6co_zFVT_OSW6uUYY1u7VPI/edit?usp=sharing

    Using twitter to facilitate peer to peer learning amongst MOOC participants.  https://twitter.com/search?q=%23ooe13&src=hash


    Filed under: EmployID Tagged: MOOC, OOE13, TOOC14

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    Hiya

    March 4th, 2014 by Angela Rees

    Originally posted on Babi Tech:

    Babi2.0 recently had her 1 st birthday.  She’s been having fun with the Toca Band app but hasn’t quite figured out what makes it work. She keeps trying to recreate the music by wiggling her fingers over a locked smartphone screen whilst dancing, makes sense, that’s what she did the first time and it worked perfectly.

    Other recent advances are that she has started to hold rectangular objects, phone, tv remote, toy with buttons to her ear and say “hiya, hiya, hiya, hiya…” Before 11 months she had been known to hold conversations via pasta and wooden blocks. She has identified the dvd remote as not being a phone because she points that one at the TV, usually during an emotional scene in a Tinkerbell as if to torment her big sister.

    She attempted some interaction with Mwnci Bach, a more child friendly version of the popular talking cat and dog apps but soon got frustrated as there’s no dancing to be done.

    View original


    Filed under: Dissertation distractions ;-)

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    British Education Studies Association Conference

    February 20th, 2014 by Cristina Costa

    Call for papers: British Education Studies Association Conference

    Glasgow, June 26-27 June

    Glasgow University

    Glasgow University cc Venana

    We would like to invite you to submit an abstract as a contribution to this important conference. This year the conference takes place in the University of Glasgow, making it the first time the conference has been held in Scotland. The key theme of this year’s conference is: “The politics of education studies: pedagogy, curriculum, policy”

    Some of the suggested topics for papers are the following:

    • Alternative voices in Education Studies

    • Innovations in Education Studies

    • Education Studies: Contemporary debates

    • Researching Education Studies: critical issues

    • Student perspectives on Education Studies

    Please note this list is not exhaustive.

    SUBMISSION DETAILS:

    Abstracts for the conference should be no longer than 400 words, and include:

    1. a clear description of the aims and objectives of your inquiry
    2. the methodology and methods employed
    3. results and key conclusions.

    You can submit an abstract by following this link: SUBMITTING AN ABSTRACT

    NOTE: You must log in or register on the  site to be able to submit an abstract – you will have this opportunity when you visit the above page.

    The Submission deadline is Friday 28th February, 2014.

    Please contact Mark.murphy.2@glasgow.ac.uk if you wish to discus your abstract before submission

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    The habitus of digital scholars

    February 14th, 2014 by Cristina Costa

    The first paper coming out from my PhD has just been published by the the Journal of Research in Learning Technology, 21(0).

    An open source tutorial on an open source study on open source communities on open source...

    CC OpenSource.com

    I’m actually quite excited about it and I have blogged about it here. (I’ll talk more about the Social Theory Applied project I have just joined in a very near future post)

    The article concerns the Participatory Web and the impact it has on academic researchers’ perceptions of digital scholarship practices. The Participatory Web, as a space of active involvement, presence and socialisation of knowledge, has the potential to introduce significant changes to scholarly practice and to diversify it. This article draws on the findings of a narrative inquiry study that investigated the habitus of 10 digital scholars. The study uses Bourdieu’s concepts of habitus, field, and social and cultural capital as a research lens. One of the main findings to come out of the study was that research participants’ approaches to digital scholarship practices are highly influenced by their online social capital, the online networks that influence their thinking and outlook on scholarly practices, including their advocacy of openness and transparency of academic practice. This article concludes by highlighting the dispositions digital scholars display in an attempt to characterise the values and beliefs that underpin their scholarly practices.

    What’s been interesting in writing this article, is that, as it often happens, my thinking has already moved on from where I was when I wrote my PhD. This resulted in a more refined approach regarding how I used Weller’s concept of digital Scholarship and Bourdieu’s thinking tools. I hope you enjoy reading the article and I look forward to a fruitful discussion. That’s the only way we can move forward this debate.

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    Storytelling with cartoons

    February 13th, 2014 by Angela Rees

    Always on the lookout for practical ways to use technology in the classroom, Pontydysgu were scoping out new ideas at Bett 2014.

    We liked the new Lego storytelling kit. One set gives you a tray of Lego bits, there are minifigs, cats, frogs, brooms, Christmas trees and more.  You also get a book of lesson plans and ides and the accompanying software. There’s also a spinner to help choose a genre or character for storytelling inspiration.  The idea is that children work in groups to tell a story, each group has a kit with enough lego bits to recreate the same scene 5 times only each one is slightly different as their stories progress.  They then take photos of their scenes and upload them to a computer where they can drag and drop the photos into a comic strip style template, add backgrounds and captions and print their story.

    The software is nice and simple to use, the lego kit has been carefully selected for optimum storyline coverage and it has the lego brand – guaranteed to spark some interest in even the most reluctant of storytellers.

    Now, here at Pontydysgu we like a good idea, but what we like even more is a free idea.  So in the tradition of those catwalk-fashion at highstreet-prices magazine articles I bring you “BETT on a budget”

     

    To create your own comic strip you will need;

    A collection of small-world-play or dolls house characters and accessories.

    A camera/ webcam/ cameraphone with the ability to transfer your photos to a computer.

    Internet access.

    An app or web based tool for comic strip creation using photographs.

    Here are some I’ve been trying out this week;

    Web based

    Toondoo – Free- You need to create account but it is easy to do. Upload photos, edit, cut shapes out and save, then go to  cartoon creator, choose comic strip layout and you can put your own images into a cartoon, choose layout template, drag and drop backgrounds and cliparts, callouts and thought bubbles to create a story.

    Downloads

    Lego Storystarter software – for creating comics, and other styles Newspaper, old manuscript £107.99 inc VAT (the whole kit based on a class of 30 is £779.99 in VAT)

    Comic Life – Cost £11.99 for a single user license or £1,049 for a site license.

    Apps for iOS/Android

    Comic touch – Free – From the creators of comic life this App cartoonises one photo at a time with no comic strip mode so you would have to print them and reassemble into a comic strip or download the pictures after editing and then use a different tool to put your story together.

     

     

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    Digital Literacies and Learning Design

    January 27th, 2014 by Cristina Costa

    I’m currently putting together the sessions for a new Module I am teaching in March for our new cohort of PGDE.

    I want to offer something that would link the concepts of Critical Digital Literacies to the design of learning activities. I want this for two reason. First, because I think this is both an area of practice and debate that has been under-explored as part of implementing the Curriculum for Excellence here in Scotland. Second, because I believe that teacher-students should put themselves in the shoes of the learners and engage hands-on with the possibilities and challenges of the web to get a better grasp how to use the web in their practice. As such, I submitted the following Module proposal:

     

    Introduction and Rationale:

    The internet and the Social and Participatory Web, as a growing phenomenon in our society, is increasingly influencing the way people work, socialise, bank and shop, to name a few. As it enters our household and workplace, what does it mean to Education? And more concretely, what impact should it have on Learning, Teaching and Assessment?

    This module aims to discuss such questions and provide an introduction to learning design methodologies in connection to key digital literacies.  In doing so, it places an emphasis on the design of learning contexts rather than of content, “the activity-rich, interaction-rich and culturally rich learning environments that the use of technology is making possible and where new principles and practices apply” (Dias Figueiredo, 2005, p.127).

    This module is designed to extend participants’ understanding of learning design in connection with the opportunities and challenges posed by the Social and Participatory Web, and thus equip them with the necessary know-how to harness technologies for the 21st century classroom.

     

    Learning Outcomes:

    The main intended outcome is that participants will be able to engage with key literature in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning and effectively apply it to their own practice. Participants will:

    • Critically compare their own ideas about Learning and Teaching with the Social and Participatory Web with those of the literature
    • Examine the implications of using the Social and Participatory Web in their Teaching practice
    • Demonstrate a practical understanding of the use of the Social and Participatory Web for their own Learning, Teaching and Assessment strategies
    • Design contexts for Learning

     

    My greatest challenge, as usual, is to find ways to engage students in both the discussions I want them to have and the activities I want them to take part in. I have been putting together a draft of activities for each session … but have now reached a point I need a new pair of eyes to look at it and give me feedback:

    • do you think I am adding too much or too little?
    • are the topics proposed relevant?
    • are the activities too easy or too hard?
    • what else should I add?

    *please note that at the moment this is only a draft – first thoughts – and your comments are very welcome as usual. ;-)

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    Learning and teaching with digital technologies is a mindset

    December 7th, 2013 by Cristina Costa

    A month or so ago, I was asked to give a lecture on learning technologies to Year 4 BEd students who are getting ready to do their last placement. The lecture was part of the Contemporary Education Issues Module and aimed to look at “more futuristic, cutting-edge practices”.

    I’m not one to predict the future. I’d rather focus on the present, on the stage I am currently at and what I can do with the ideals I currently embrace and the tools, technologies, and support structures that are available to me. And so, with this in mind, I organised the lecture.

    I started with a set of questions that aimed to elicit people’s ideas about learning and teaching in the “21st century classroom”. I know this type of phrases is not that great but they do help get the conversation started. The purpose of the lecture was to make connections between students’ use of digital technology in their daily life and the connection, or lack of it, with their professional life. I sensed that for many, connecting social and professional, daily and teaching practice was a hard thing to imagine, let alone do. And this has to do as much with preparedness as it has to do with entitlement to question established practices.

    What I did not want to do was to dismiss current, “analog” practices as bad or useless, because they are not necessarily so. Rather, I wanted to trigger new ways of thinking about teaching practices in relation to the current changing society and our own practices outside the classroom, and what it meant for learning. Technology plays a massive role in our daily lives. As we grow more and more used to it, we only really notice it when it is missing. Who hasn’t felt some kind of “withdrawal syndrome” when you go abroad and all of a sudden you can no longer access mobile Internet?! … at least not at the same price. The Internet and the Web have become indispensable commodities for a large part of a society that relies of digital technologies to consume and produce information. Knowledge is still (a form of em)power(ing), and we can anticipate it will always be so. The same applies to Education. Mandela talked from experience when he said that

    But as the world changes, so do our practices and approaches to living and working, and also learning.  Hence, for Education to keep its currency, it needs to keep up with the times. The way through which we can access and create information online provide alternatives as to how individuals can *be* successful learners, effective contributors and responsible citizens as they develop their confidence as active participants and learners (see the 4 capacities). As such this begs the following questions:

    • What is the role of education in ensuring that our current, and future, generations as prepared to address these new ways of being (members of a society that is progressively relying on digital forms of living, learning and working)?
    • What is our duty in equipping children, and learners in general, with the “adequate” cultural capital to tackle the challenges posed by the digital society?

    This might just be me… but I do think the Curriculum for Excellence does touch on this matter, even if ever so slightly, with the 4 capacities (see above). If we place it in the context  of what Education Scotland calls  “literacies across learning: principles and practice” and their definition of literacy as a “a set of skills that allows the individual to engage fully in society and in learning (…)” then surely the debate of digital technologies needs to be a key item on the agenda. Yet, this is not only a topic for Scotland or for primary teachers; it is rather a crucial debate to be had with regards to all levels of education as well as different forms of learning! Getting back to my lecture, there were a series of key points that I wanted to get across and which I hope to go into further detail in future blogposts. For the time being, I just want to list them here for future reference. I would be interested in knowing of your views about this debate, which although is not new, it is still very relevant.

    • Teaching and learning with digital technologies is not only a new form of practice; it is a mindset
      • Not only a change of technology; a change of attitudes
    • Digital technologies provide tools for content and context creation.
      • Teachers as context facilitators
      • Learners as content creators
    • Technology dissonance: a clash of practices and approaches
      • The place of technology in and outside the classroom
    • The role of the institution, and policy, in harmonising practices
    • A curriculum for authentic learning and assessment
      • Changing the ways learners communicate learning

    Above all, I am trying to answer the following question: Can digital technologies, and the philosophies of practice associated with it, finally deliver on the promise of critical pedagogies? What do you think? I’d also be interested in knowing which of the topics above you’d like to discuss first.

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    Symposium “Mapping and evaluating research on Young people as Visual Culture Producers”

    November 19th, 2013 by Daniela Reimann

    The 1st International Symposium ” mor thN img cnsmrs: Mapping and evaluating research on Young people as Visual Culture Producers “ will take place in
    Iruña-Pamplona over 22 – 23 November – 2013. It is Organized by the EDARTE (UPNA/NUP) Research Group (Dr. Imanol Aguirre) at the Departament of Psychology and Pedagogy at the Public University of Navarra funded by the Ministry of Science and Innovation – Government of Spain.

    ABOUT THE SYMPOSIUM

    The research group of the Public University of Navarre, EDARTE, announces the first International Symposium “mor thN img cnsmrs. Mapping and evaluating research on Visual Culture youth producers” which will take place in Pamplona on November 22-23, 2013.

    Since 2010, EDARTE is developing the research project “Young People as Visual Culture Producers: Artistic Skills and Knowledge in Secondary Education” (EDU 2009-13712). Now, in the final stage of this study, we’ve considered necessary to organize a scientific encounter to share the results of our investigation with other international research groups that have worked on this field of study.

    This meeting pursues a triple objective: First, to disseminate different studies on youth as visual culture producers that have been developed in the last five years in different parts of the world. Second, to enable the creation of a map of this area of study that will contribute to structure the field of research with other experts. Finally, to evaluate our own research project, its goals, its methods and results, comparing them with those obtained by the participant groups in their researches.

    As we have explained, this is a meeting of invited experts, not open to paper submissions from other researchers. However, the participation of those people who want to join us in the symposium will be welcomed, especially in the debates that will take place after each of the presentations.

    The debates will focus on the following questions:

    Ethical and academic concerns in the research of/with the youth as VC producers.
    Media education and the VC production of the youth.
    Art education and VC in relation with the production of young people.
    Museums as out-school settings in relation with the VC production of the youth.
    Youth digital production and VC.
    Skills/knowledges/saviors of young people.
    School learning/researching experiences in relation with the production of VC

    INVITED SPEAKERS

    The studies to be presented in the talks have been selected for their scientific rigor and its relevance to the fields of education, arts, youth, or information technologies.

    ponentes

    PROGRAMME

    VIERNES 22
    09.15 – 09.30: Arrival.
    09.30 – 09.40: Opening.
    09.40 – 10.55: Conference: Kerry Freedman “Art Outside of School: Youth Visual Culture Learning Communities”
    10.55 – 11:15: Coffee Break.
    11:15 – 12.30: Conference: EDARTE “Saberes y lugares de la producción de cultura visual de los jóvenes”
    12.30 -13.45: Conference: Crystle Martin “Fantasy Wrestling: Youth Digital Production and Visual Culture in a Competitive Fandom and Connected Learning Environment”
    13.45 – 15.45: Lunch Break.
    15.45 – 17.00: Conference: Daniela Reimann “Digital media in creative processes with young people in vocational preparation measures”
    17.00 – 17.15: Coffee Break
    17.15 – 18.30: Conference: Alfred Porres “9nubes. Nueve anotaciones flotantes en torno a la investigación con jóvenes como productores de cultura visual en contextos educativos”

    SÁBADO 23
    09.45 – 11.00: Conference: Vitus Vestergaard “Playing with the Camera – Creating with Each Other: Video Production and Collaborative Emergence in a Museum Setting”
    11.00 – 11.20: Coffee Break.
    11.20 – 12.35: Conference: Rachel Fender “Visual culture as living inquiry: looking at how young people reflect on, share and narrate their learning practices in and outside school”
    12.35 – 13.50: Conference: Julian Sefton-Green “Critical synthesis of the different perspectives around media production, digital culture, youth participation and visual culture”
    13.50 – 14.00: Closing and lunch time.

    LANGUAGES
    English will be the official language of the symposium. Bilingual simultaneous interpreting (English-Spanish-English) will be facilitated during the talks.

    VENUE
    Museum of Navarre (more info): Address: C/ Santo Domingo, 47, 31001 Pamplona

    ATTENDEE REGISTRATION
    Registration is free. Each attendee must register sending an e-mail with his/her name and surname to info@edarte.org.

    Info via the symposium Website

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    RAdioActive101 Dissemination *free* event

    October 23rd, 2013 by Cristina Costa

    RadioActive101 in cooperation with the Centre for Lifelong Learning at the University of Strathclyde is organising a *free* dissemination event on the 13th of November 2013.

     

    RadioActive101 promotes the engagement, informal learning and employability of disenfranchised young people through internet radio and social media. RadioActive101 is an approach to radio and social media that catalyses, organises and legitimises the digital practices, content production and critical and creative potential of disenfranchised young people – to provide a new and original community voice.

     

    Please join us:

    • For a discussion of the impact of radio with disenfranchised young people
    • For a presentation of the evaluation of the advanced pilot
    • To learn how to get involved and roll out Internet Radio in your community

    Registration can be done via this link.

    Any questions of suggestions, please don’t hesitate to contact me at cristina.costa[@]strath.ac.uk (remove [ ] when emailing me)

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