Archive for the ‘Presentations’ Category

Woodstock for Geeks

June 17th, 2019 by Graham Attwell

I love the description of big academic conferences as “Woodstock for Geeks.” This is a brilliantly made cartoon by Mike Morrison, not only explaining the problem with poster sessions at conferences but putting forward a simple template for designing research posters as a practical help to overcoming the problem.

One part of the design idea is to include a QR code providing access to further information, papers and so on. My friends from Kubify have gone one step further producing mini posters linking to ‘stacks’ of interactive and multimedia material.

Kubify’s Learning Toolbox, they say,  “is an award-winning ePoster platform and is a versatile tool that can also be used to support other event and education activities.

Learning Toolbox allows people to quickly and easily build their own stacks of interactive and multimedia material and share them with others. These dynamic stacks can be used as ePosters, research calling cards or learning resources.”

Rich ePoster content

“A Learning Toolbox ePoster can contain many different rich resources such as videos, images, audio, apps, presentations, twitter and links to interactive online resources.”

Workplace Learning Analytics for Facilitation in European Public Employment Services

April 29th, 2016 by Graham Attwell

This week I have been at the pre-conference workshops for the Learning analytics conference in Edinburgh. This is my presentation at the workshop on Workplace Learning Analytics. And below is the abstract of my paper together with a link to download the full paper, if you should wish. In the next few days,  I will write up a reflection on the workshops, plus some new ideas that emerged from talking with participants.
Abstract

The paper is based on early research and practices in developing workplace Learning Analytics for the EU funded EmployID project, focused on identity transformation and continuing professional development in Public Employment Services (PES) in Europe. Workplace learning is mostly informal with little agreement of proxies for learning, driven by demands of work tasks or intrinsic interests of the learner, by self-directed exploration and social exchange that is tightly connected to processes and the places of work. Rather than focusing on formal learning, LA in PES needs to be based on individual and collective social practices and informal learning and facilitation processes rather than formal education. Furthermore, there are considerable concerns and restraints over the use of data in PES including data privacy and issues including power relations and hierarchies.

Following a consultation process about what innovations PES would like to pilot and what best meets their needs, PES defined priorities for competence advancement around the ‘resourceful learner’, self-reflection and self-efficacy as core competences for their professional identity transformation. The paper describes an approach based on Social Learning Analytics linked to the activities of the EmployID project in developing social learning including advanced coaching, reflection, networking and learning support services. SLA focuses on how learners build knowledge together in their cultural and social settings. In the context of online social learning, it takes into account both formal and informal educational environments, including networks and communities. The final section of the paper reports on work in progress to build a series of tools to embed SLA within communities and practices in PES organisations.

Download the paper (PDF)

Student Voice

August 23rd, 2013 by Graham Attwell

“What do we mean by student voice” asks Catherine Cronin in the blog which accompanies this presentation.  She says “the term tends to signify a set of values and behaviours which includes Sound (the act of speaking), Participation (student presence and involvement), and Power or Agency (see Cook-Sather, 2006). Making space for student voices confronts the power dynamics within schools, classrooms, and the relationships between teachers and students. Without addressing the notion of power in these relationships, student voice initiatives may be simply window dressing. When we truly value and create spaces for student voices, students feel respected and engaged, teachers listen, and students and teachers learn from one another.”

The reality is complex, messy and diverse!

July 23rd, 2013 by Graham Attwell

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We are spending a lot of time at the moment designing a mobile e-learning application for apprentices in the construction industry in Germany. There are many issues – but we seem to be getting on top of the technology. Much more difficult is the pedagogic approach. I like this slideshow by Geoff Stead, recently joined Qualcomm to lead their m-learning initiatives. He says there is no single, correct answer.  The reality is complex, messy and diverse!

Everything Unplugged

June 27th, 2013 by Graham Attwell

Lets face it, most presentations don’t add a lot new. But I always enjoy presentations by Fred Garnet. There is always something there to make you think. This presentation, from September 2012, “captures the history of and learning from the Everything Unplugged project. Learning conversations with the aim of change.” It was been prepared to help with the launch of Everything Unplugged East in Norwich on September 7th, 2012.

Theories for a digital age

May 12th, 2013 by Graham Attwell

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I enjoyed this presentation by Steve Wheeler at a recent Elesig seminar. Nothing new here. But Steve always produces great slides and it provides a very neat overview pulling together developments in the pedagogy of learning using technology. There is also a recording of the seminar, attended by some 95 participants, on the Elesig portal (login required).

Digital Scholarship

April 18th, 2013 by Graham Attwell

I have recently had a series of conversations with Cristina Costa on ideas around digital scholarship (we might even publish something together on this in the future!). And by luck I found this interesting presentation by Cristobal Cobo Romaní. The presnetation is based on a paper he has written. Cristobal says on his blog: “Widespread access to digital technologies has enabled digital scholars to access, create, share, and disseminate academic contents in innovative and diversified ways. Today academic teams in different places can collaborate in virtual environments by conducting scholarly work on the Internet. Two relevant dimensions that have been deeply affected by the emergence of digital scholarship are new facets of knowledge generation (wikis, e-science, online education, distributed R&D, open innovation, open science, peer-based production, online encyclopedias, user generated content) and new models of knowledge circulation and distribution (e-journals, open repositories, open licenses, academic podcasting initiatives, etc.).:

Teaching and learning in Contexts

February 5th, 2013 by Graham Attwell

Neat presentation by Cristina Costa. I particularly like the way that mixing a very few words with pictures tells a story – even without an audio track. And at a time when we are struggling to understand the different contexts in which learning takes place this is a good introduction.

Knowledge is grown, not created

December 6th, 2012 by Graham Attwell

Good presentation by Stephen Downes. It was interesting to note that, unlike in the popular press, delegates at Online Educa Berlin 2012, mostly understood the difference between the cMOOCs, as developed by Stephen and friends, and the xMOOCs now being pushed out by the likes of Coursera and Udacity. I especially like slide 20 where Stephen says “Knowledge is grown, not created – we can stimulate it; we can’t manage it.”

Education innovation

November 12th, 2012 by Graham Attwell

OK – it is a year and a half old ….but the ideas in this ‘curated conversation’ still seem relevant to me.
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    News Bites

    Digital Literacy

    A National Survey fin Wales in 2017-18 showed that 15% of adults (aged 16 and over) in Wales do not regularly use the internet. However, this figure is much higher (26%) amongst people with a limiting long-standing illness, disability or infirmity.

    A new Welsh Government programme has been launched which will work with organisations across Wales, in order to help people increase their confidence using digital technology, with the aim of helping them improve and manage their health and well-being.

    Digital Communities Wales: Digital Confidence, Health and Well-being, follows on from the initial Digital Communities Wales (DCW) programme which enabled 62,500 people to reap the benefits of going online in the last two years.

    See here for more information


    Zero Hours Contracts

    Figures from the UK Higher Education Statistics Agency show that in total almost 11,500 people – both academics and support staff – working in universities on a standard basis were on a zero-hours contract in 2017-18, out of a total staff head count of about 430,000, reports the Times Higher Education.  Zero-hours contract means the employer is not obliged to provide any minimum working hours

    Separate figures that only look at the number of people who are employed on “atypical” academic contracts (such as people working on projects) show that 23 per cent of them, or just over 16,000, had a zero-hours contract.


    Resistance decreases over time

    Interesting research on student centered learning and student buy in, as picked up by an article in Inside Higher Ed. A new study published in PLOS ONE, called “Knowing Is Half the Battle: Assessments of Both Student Perception and Performance Are Necessary to Successfully Evaluate Curricular Transformation finds that student resistance to curriculum innovation decreases over time as it becomes the institutional norm, and that students increasingly link active learning to their learning gains over time


    Postgrad pressure

    Research published this year by Vitae and the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) and reported by the Guardian highlights the pressure on post graduate students.

    “They might suffer anxiety about whether they deserve their place at university,” says Sally Wilson, who led IES’s contribution to the research. “Postgraduates can feel as though they are in a vacuum. They don’t know how to structure their time. Many felt they didn’t get support from their supervisor.”

    Taught students tend to fare better than researchers – they enjoy more structure and contact, says Sian Duffin, student support manager at Arden University. But she believes anxiety is on the rise. “The pressure to gain distinction grades is immense,” she says. “Fear of failure can lead to perfectionism, anxiety and depression.”


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  • RT @seni_bl Wow! Norway is seeing an example: "Priority is to be given to three interdisciplinary themes: democracy and citizenship, sustainable development, and public health and wellbeing. These three transversal themes shall be reflected in all subjects where applicable..." #education twitter.com/annmic/status/…

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