Archive for the ‘Presentations’ Category

The purpose of education

October 8th, 2012 by Graham Attwell

Another neat presentation from Steve Wheeler looking at the future of education. I particularly like the slides illustrating creativity and thinking outside the box. There is probably nothing particularly new here, but Steve maintains a visual narrative throughout the presentation.

Control and ownership

August 19th, 2012 by Graham Attwell

This presentation by Ilona Buchem to the PLE21012 conference is based on a study on the psychological ownership of Personal learning Environments. Ilona says: “One of most interesting outcomes of the study was the relation between control and ownership. The results show that while perceived control of intangible aspects of a learning environment (such as being able to determine the subject matter or access rights) has a much larger impact on the feeling of ownership of a learning environment than perceived control of tangible aspects (such as being able to choose the technology).”

BYOD

July 5th, 2012 by Graham Attwell
 

View more PowerPoint from Sam Gliksman

At long last there is an opening up of the discussion around users own technology – both in education and in companies. Sam Gliksman says: “Schools are needing increasing amounts of expensive educational technology at a time when budgets are shrinking. Many have started to explore BYOD policies – Bring Your Own Device – as a practical solution to integrate cost effective technology into their educational programs.

With the convergence of widespread broadband and the growth of powerful, platform independent web based tools BYOD has finally arrived as an effective educational alternative to other plans that require expensive purchasing and maintenance. Viewed within a realistic perspective of both its benefits and limitations BYOD can provide a workable solution for the many schools seeking to upgrade their educational technology.”

The future of higher education

June 16th, 2012 by Graham Attwell
CANHEIT
View more PowerPoint from gsiemens

Interesting presentation by George Siemens. George says: “Educators are not driving the change bus. Leadership in traditional universities has been grossly negligent in preparing the academy for the economic and technological reality it now faces. ….. Universities have not been paying attention. As a result, they have not developed systemic capacity to function in a digital networked age.”

It is well worth reading the blog accompanying this presentation where George explains his ideas.

e-Readers

May 9th, 2012 by Graham Attwell

This is a very neat presentation by Steve Warburton looking at the results of an empirical study on the benefits and downside of e-readers in higher education. First presented at the BILETA 2012 Conference.

Design, literacies, spaces and metaphors

April 10th, 2012 by Graham Attwell

Grainne Conole managed to double book herself for a recent presentation. So as a recompense she has posted this 35 minutes slidecast, New ecologies of learning: design, digital literacies, spaces and metaphors. Well worth a watch – and I know how hard it is to record these things and sync them up. For what it is worth, I am unconvinced by the continuing reliance on VLEs and in particular BlackBoard. I still think VLEs are a barrier to innovation particularly in terms fo etaching and learning with technology. But I like the section on metaphor which brings together a series of interesting ideas. s

Using and visualising data

March 25th, 2012 by Graham Attwell
View more PowerPoint from Tony Hirst

Although this presentation is entitled ‘Data Driven Journalism’, it provides a great introduction for anyone wanting to use data – and more particularly data visualisations for research and development. Tont Hirst’s blog, OUseful blog, is a brilliant source of ideas for those interested in this fast growing area of work.

Reflective learning environments

February 12th, 2012 by Graham Attwell

Reflection is a thing pedagogic researchers and Technology Enhanced Learning developers talk about a lot. To little end I sometimes think. It can be a bit of a black box.

Peter Papas says: “Over the last few years I’ve led many teachers and administrators on classroom walkthroughs designed to foster a collegial conversation about teaching and learning. The walkthroughs served as roving Socratic seminars and a catalyst for reflection. But reflection can be a challenging endeavor. It’s not something that’s fostered in school – typically someone else tells you how you’re doing! At best, students can narrate what they did, but have trouble thinking abstractly about their learning – patterns, connections and progress. Likewise teachers and principals need encouragement and opportunities to think more reflectively about their craft.

In an effort to help schools become more reflective learning environments, I’ve developed this “Taxonomy of Reflection.” – modeled on Bloom’s approach.

Using technology to develop assessment for learning

January 21st, 2012 by Graham Attwell

Assessment isn’t really my thing. That doesn’t mean I do not see it as important. I am interested in learning. Assessment for learning should help teachers and learners alike in developing their learning. But all too often assessment has little to do with learning. Indeed assessment has emerged as a barrier to the development of effective teaching and learning strategies especially collaborative learning using web 2.0 and social software tools.

This presentation by Luis Tinoca follows the present trend of adding 2.0 on the end of everything but is a useful exploration of how we can use technologies to support assessment for learning

Play, emergent curricula, serendipity and opportunity

January 21st, 2012 by Graham Attwell

In a blog post about the BETT show in London I complained that there was little evidence about using technology for teaching and learning. And that is why I like this presentation by Helen Keegan. Whilst she looks at a whole series of web and social networking tools the whole focus is on real life use. I particularly like her advice on slide 32 – “Leave space in the course to allow space for play, emergent curricula, serendipity and opportunity.”

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    Innovation is male dominated?

    Times Higher Education reports that in the UK only one in 10 university spin-out companies has a female founder, analysis suggests. And these companies are much less likely to attract investment too, raising concerns that innovation is becoming too male-dominated.


    Open Educational Resources

    BYU researcher John Hilton has published a new study on OER, student efficacy, and user perceptions – a synthesis of research published between 2015 and 2018. Looking at sixteen efficacy and twenty perception studies involving over 120,000 students or faculty, the study’s results suggest that students achieve the same or better learning outcomes when using OER while saving a significant amount of money, and that the majority of faculty and students who’ve used OER had a positive experience and would do so again.


    Digital Literacy

    A National Survey fin Wales in 2017-18 showed that 15% of adults (aged 16 and over) in Wales do not regularly use the internet. However, this figure is much higher (26%) amongst people with a limiting long-standing illness, disability or infirmity.

    A new Welsh Government programme has been launched which will work with organisations across Wales, in order to help people increase their confidence using digital technology, with the aim of helping them improve and manage their health and well-being.

    Digital Communities Wales: Digital Confidence, Health and Well-being, follows on from the initial Digital Communities Wales (DCW) programme which enabled 62,500 people to reap the benefits of going online in the last two years.

    See here for more information


    Zero Hours Contracts

    Figures from the UK Higher Education Statistics Agency show that in total almost 11,500 people – both academics and support staff – working in universities on a standard basis were on a zero-hours contract in 2017-18, out of a total staff head count of about 430,000, reports the Times Higher Education.  Zero-hours contract means the employer is not obliged to provide any minimum working hours

    Separate figures that only look at the number of people who are employed on “atypical” academic contracts (such as people working on projects) show that 23 per cent of them, or just over 16,000, had a zero-hours contract.


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