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Crowd sourcing my presentations

May 26th, 2009 by Graham Attwell

Much as I enjoy doing presentations at conferences it does seem oh some Web 1.0 ish. So i am working on how to make such events a little more interactive. Twitter is great – if conference organisers can make available a second screen at events. At least then people can ask questions during the presentation (I always tell people they are free to interrupt me but they seldom do). I have messed with buzz groups during the presentation but this always seems a little artificial.

I like the presentation Dave Cormier did at the WIAOC conference last weekend. I wasn’t at it, neither have I watched the video but his community crowd sourced slides both provide a wealth of shared learning and give the impression the event was a lot of fun. For explanation of the idea behind it see his blog.

I am going to try doing something like that next week at the ProLearn Summer School in Zilina.

I have just been writing a long overdue abstract for my keynote presentation at the DFG Research Training Group E-Learning conference on Interdisciplinary approaches to technology-enhanced learning (IATEL) in Darmstadt in June.

I was not quite sure what to talk about – the overall theme I was given is Learning in Networks – from learning in the Network to the learning Network and back.

So I am crowdsourcing the abstract to blog readers. What have I missed out? What other ideas should I include? All contributors will get a citation on the final slide!

Abstract

Graham Attwell will look at the evolution of learning networks.

The presentation will also look at the development of educations systems and the spread of mass education through an industrial model with curriculum based on expert knowledge. He will go on to examine key issues including control at the level of content, institutions and curriculum.

The presentation will look at the changing ways people are learning and developing and sharing knowledge using Web 2.0 and social software tools. Such practice is facilitating the development of personal learning pathways and integration within dispersed communities if practice.

The presentation will examine recent ideas and theory about learning in networks including the idea of rhizomatic curricula and connectivism.

As learning networks become more important, the issue of digital identities is attracting more attention. How do individuals interact in learning networks and whet is the role of tools such as Twitter? How important is the idea of place within learning networks?

The presentation will consider how learning takes place in Personal Learning Environments drawing on the work of Levi Stauss on bricolage and Goffman’s dramatulurgical perspective.

Finally the presentation will consider the implication of ideas of learning in networks and Pe

4 Responses to “Crowd sourcing my presentations”

  1. Hi, interesting idea to use a second screen for Twitter at conferences, so people can ask questions continuously during the event.

  2. martin says:

    i’d like to hear something about what web-enabled “networks” really *are* as i have the growing suspicion that we all are too early too satisfied with just using the vague & buzzy N-word.

    weak ties (like being-loosely-joined-in-Twitter vs. “class” in some SocialSoftware), serendipity, casual information/communication channels, defining oneself by network activities not profiles/roles, a short theory of attention impulses and chain reactions, how volatile can impulses turn into sustainable mindpatterns … something like that.

  3. Frances Bell says:

    I think that you have missed out learning at my mother’s knee, gossip and carrier pigeons 🙂

  4. Something on professional learning, perhaps — where academic discipline/subject area meets established community of those in workplace. Some (most?) of the latter — not all — are ahead of the former in terms of using web2.0 tools and social media for learning, for example. Also relates to professional socialisation (and more).

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