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Facebook no longer cool?

November 26th, 2010 by Graham Attwell
Fecbook’s domination of the Web will not last for ever. And, according to this article Facebook may be in decline, at least with younger and more fashion conscious user groups.
clipped from www.adweek.com
In its early days, social-networking site Facebook was propelled to
popularity by a college-age crowd that sought it out as an
exclusive sanctuary in which to connect with their peers. For that
market, it was an attractive alternative to sites deemed to have
lost their cool — like MySpace, which had become a haven for
pre-teens and high schoolers.
Now, it seems, Facebook might be suffering a similar migration.
According to comScore, as it has gained a broader audience, the
older teens and twentysomethings that drove Facebook’s initial
popularity are using it less. And research by WPP Group’s Mindshare
suggests that group is reevaluating the site’s worth as a tool for
developing friendships. Others believe Facebook’s cool factor among
younger users is waning. “When you start getting friended by your
grandmother, I think that’s when it starts to lose its cool,” said
Huw Griffiths, evp and global director of marketing accountability
and research at Interpublic Group’s Universal McCann.
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