GoogleTranslate Service


Youth and Unemployment

November 23rd, 2012 by Ana García Muñoz

One of the most dramatic consequences of the current crisis is the increase in unemployment amongst young people.A situation that constitutes a serious problem throughout Europe but is specially troubling in Spain where the unemployment rate amongst the youth is more than 50 percent.

In Spain, is the result of economic policies based on austerity measures: cuts in public education, in R&D (Research and Development), budget cuts in the University system, increasing courses fees at high levels and a reform in our  labour market that clearly destroy jobs rather than create them.

Our goverment consideres these measures to be a necessary evil that citizens must suffer in order to emerge from the crisis.

In view of this catastrophic scena that our politicians have created, this alarming increase of unemployment is hardly surprising.The measures taken not only produce unemployment but also poverty, huge social inequality ,suffering and no hope for the future.

We are living in a time in which  the only important thing is the pursuit of money, above all, where the world of money is leading our lives  without social and human rights, and where, young people are victims of a runaway capitalism which allows this situation to arise.

As the sociologist Alain Touraine said : “Don´t talk about “recovery policies”  only about rigorous austerity.There are no new economic nor social alternatives.Nobody has a solution.”

Regarding young people, he also adds: ” They are not only confused, in fact, there are no clues, there is no way , there is no right,left ,forward, back..”.

Expressions such as “lost generation”  and NEETs( not in Employment,Education or Training) are used to describe the situation of young people. As far  as I´m concerned I don´t agree with these expressions; they don´t reflect what is really happpening.

Most young people cannot study as they don´t have enough money to do so and they cannot work because there are no jobs.

Beatriz Pérez is 27  years old and has a degree in Chemistry.She said- “We are not a lost generation, we are a forgotten generation.

She also  considered that politicians talk about the importance of training and the dropout problem but don´t give solutions.

She said “Who remembers that we young people have done everything that was espected of us? We have studied  Degrees, Másters, Languages…; How can you motivate future generations to grow if the ones who have been educated are called lost?”.

Pedro Martínez ,24 years old, has been wiyhout a job since to years ago. He has left his studies due to economic problems.He doesn´t like the expression NEET.He said ” I´m not a neet because I don´t have a job because of the circumnstances. I would like to have had more opportunities to finish my studies.

As a result,most of young people have been forced to emigrate to the North of Europe and beyond finding better  opportunities.In fact, new migratory flows from Southern Countries (basically Spain and Greece) to Nothern Countries are emerging.

A phenomenon that affects both qualified and  unqualified people.

But the problem goes far beyond youth  unemployment.In today´s dinamic economy with the rapid development of the labour market in many sctors (tecnological, organizational..) many young people with degrees ,but long term unemployment, are considered inadequated for the “new jobs” , so they can forced to work to make a living in low skilled jobs despite having a higher education.And for those that no have qualifications the result is expulsion from the system.

The general strikes that took place last 14 th of November reflected the outrage and unhappiness of people with the austerity measures.It´s inadmissible that  the German goverment wit their army of sevants,including Spaín´s goverment , adopted measures that lead only to destruction of countries. Measures that so far have been shown to be ineffective in finding an exit from the crisis.

Where are the éthic and morality in such measures? We cannot accept policies that only create high levels of unemployment, poverty, suicides..

In summary, policies which are built on people´s suffering.

So, What is the sense in these politics? there is none at this time.Politicies must be based on the  needs of people and not on specific interests of global speculation.

What does Europe want to do with Spain and with the rest of Southern European Countries?  What means Europe at this moment?  Are with on a path to disintegration?

The last strkikes wre more than justified ;people were only fifghting  for a decent  life and for their rights.

 

 

 

One Response to “Youth and Unemployment”

  1. Pekka Kamarainen says:

    Ana has raised serious issues. This grim picture was heavily present at the European Conference on Educational Research (ECER’12) last September in Cadiz. VETNET, the European umbrella network for research in vocational education and training (VET) dedicated its opening session for the topic “Crisis, Youth Unemployment and the Role of VET”. The following link leads to a brief summary of that session on the Virtual Community page of a recent European project:

    http://coop-pbl.com/en/archives/1578

    I know that it is not much of an answer to say that European researchers have discussed this issue (with inputs from Spain, Germany and Australia). Yet, I hope that our joint discussion was not mere lip-service but paved a way to initiatives and proposals how to tackle such problems as Ana mentioned in our future projects.

  • Search Pontydysgu.org

    News Bites

    Online Educa Berlin

    Are you going to Online Educa Berlin 2014. As usual we will be there, with Sounds of the Bazaar, our internet radio station, broadcasting live from the Marlene bar on Thursday 4 and Friday 5 December. And as always, we are looking for people who would like to come on the programme. Tell us about your research or your project. tell us about cool new ideas and apps for learning. Or just come and blow off steam about something you feel strongly about. If you would like to pre-book a slot on the radio email graham10 [at] mac [dot] com telling us what you would like to talk about.


    Consultation

    Diana Laurillard, Chair of ALT, has invited contributions to a consultation on education technology to provide input to ETAG, the Education Technology Action Group, which was set up in England in February 2014 by three ministers: Michael Gove, Matthew Hancock and David Willetts.

    The deadline for contributions is 23 June at http://goo.gl/LwR65t.


    Social Tech Guide

    The Nominet Trust have announced their new look Social Tech Guide.

    The Social Tech Guide first launched last year, initially as a home to the 2013 Nominet Trust 100 – which they describe as a list of 100 inspiring digital projects tackling the world’s most pressing social issues.

    In  a press relase they say: “With so many social tech ventures out there supporting people and enforcing positive change on a daily basis, we wanted to create a comprehensive resource that allows us to celebrate and learn from the pioneers using digital technology to make a real difference to millions of lives.

    The Social Tech Guide now hosts a collection of 100′s of social tech projects from around the world tackling everything from health issues in Africa to corruption in Asia. You can find out about projects that have emerged out of disaster to ones that use data to build active and cohesive communities. In fact, through the new search and filter functionality on the site, you should find it quick and easy to immerse yourself in an inspiring array of social tech innovations.”


    Code Academy expands

    The New York-based Codecademy has translated its  learn-to-code platform into three new languages today and formalized partnerships in five countries.

    So if you speak French, Spanish or Portuguese, you can now access the Codecademy site and study all of its resources in your native language.

    Codecademy teamed up with Libraries Without Borders (Bibliotheques sans Frontieres) to tackle the French translation and is now working on pilot programs that should reduce unemployment and bring programming into schools. In addition, Codecademy will be weaving its platform into Ideas Box, a humanitarian project that helps people in refugee camps and disaster zones to learn new skills. Zach Sims, CEO of Codecademy, says grants from the public and private sector in France made this collaboration possible.

    The Portuguese translation was handled in partnership with The Lemann Foundation, one of the largest education foundations in Brazil. As with France, Codecademy is planning several pilots to help Brazilian speakers learn new skills. Meanwhile in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the company has been working closely with the local government on a Spanish version of its popular site.

    Codecademy is also linking up up with the Tiger Leap program in Estonia, with the aim of teaching every school student how to program.


    Other Pontydysgu Spaces

  • Twitter

    RT @Jisc Duct Tape University is an #OER discovery & publishing tool - see @onefuzzyduck discuss it at #studentideas showcase youtube.com/watch?v=DZta8t…

    About 3 hours ago from Graham Attwell's Twitter via Tweetbot for Mac

  • Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet & PC in 1974 #FB youtu.be/OIRZebE8O84

    About 2 days ago from Cristina Costa's Twitter via iOS

  • Sounds of the Bazaar AudioBoo

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • Meta

  • Upcoming Events

      There are no events.
  • Categories