Archive for the ‘Angela Blog’ Category

Media Literacy training and resources for educators.

December 6th, 2017 by Angela Rees
Media in Action launches in January 2018.  Find out more on our shiny new website mediainaction.eu In the meantime, you can join our network of associates by filling in the form below. We are looking for people interested in teaching or learning about media literacy, media literacy experts, people who work in the media, schools,...

Please sponsor me for being selfish.

September 26th, 2017 by Angela Rees
I’m doing the Cardiff Half Marathon on Sunday 1st October. That’s 13.1 miles (21.1km). I’m not fast. In fact I’m pretty slow. I’ve not been able to train or prepare as much as I would have liked. It won’t be easy. It will hurt and I will be sore for a few days after, if […]

Media in Action

September 21st, 2017 by Angela Rees
Exciting things are always happening at Pontydysgu but this one I’m particularly looking forward to. From January 2018 I will be working with, COFAC in Portugal, Cooperativa Nuova Dimensione in Italy, Grupo Comunicar Andalusia and KIC Malta on a Media Literacy for all pilot project funded by DG Connect Media in Action is a project in […]

A New Digital Era

April 25th, 2017 by Angela Rees
Reflections on the contents and conversations from weeks 3 and 4; A New Digital Era I’m a tutor on the EmployID MOOC “The Changing World of Work” on the EMMA platform which is still has a few weeks left to run and is still available to join via the link above! I’ve mostly been the […]

Feminist Maker Spaces

March 14th, 2017 by Angela Rees
A post I wrote for the Taccle3 project output on STEM attitudes and encouraging girls and young women to engage in STEM… I recently came across the article The Rise of Feminist Hacker Spaces and How to Make Your Own which describes the history and creation of Double Union hacker space in San Fransisco.  A hacker […]

TACCLE3 CODING Conference

March 8th, 2017 by Angela Rees
On October 6th 2017 we are organising the Taccle3 project’s final conference in the Flemish Parliament in Brussels. If you: • Want to learn more about ‘computational thinking’ and the link with coding, • Listen to some motivational speakers • Participate in hands-on workshops full of practical class room approaches … then mark the date […]

Digital revolution

February 28th, 2017 by Angela Rees
I’m putting the finishing touches on the content for the 3rd week of the Changing World of Work MOOC by the EmployID project and hosted on the EMMA platform. You can sign up here. Infographic created with Canva  4th industrial revolution infographic by Angela Rees is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Permissions […]

Free course on The Changing World of Work

February 17th, 2017 by Angela Rees
Do you want to be prepared for the challenges of the changing labour market? Do you want to better understand and apply skills related to emotional awareness, active listening, reflection, coaching skills, peer coaching and powerful questioning? Do you want to explore tools for handling Labour Market Information (LMI) and the digital agenda? This course […]

Work Place Learning Space

September 14th, 2016 by Angela Rees
Graham asked me to do something fun which is unusual because *everyday* is fun at Pontydysgu. He asked for five photographs around learning spaces so I tried to capture the five most important aspects of my work based learning. My desk Complete with coffee, piles of unsorted paperwork, family photos, sharpies, MacBook, interweb, and most […]

What can Open Data do for public services?

July 12th, 2016 by Angela Rees
Originally posted on Good Practice Exchange at The Wales Audit Office:
The Wales Audit Office is holding a Google Hangout on Open Data. It will look at how Open Data can help public services to deliver joined up, transparent and effective public services. In this blogpost, Dyfrig Williams looks at why the Good Practice Exchange is interested…
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    Zero Hours Contracts

    Figures from the UK Higher Education Statistics Agency show that in total almost 11,500 people – both academics and support staff – working in universities on a standard basis were on a zero-hours contract in 2017-18, out of a total staff head count of about 430,000, reports the Times Higher Education.  Zero-hours contract means the employer is not obliged to provide any minimum working hours

    Separate figures that only look at the number of people who are employed on “atypical” academic contracts (such as people working on projects) show that 23 per cent of them, or just over 16,000, had a zero-hours contract.


    Resistance decreases over time

    Interesting research on student centered learning and student buy in, as picked up by an article in Inside Higher Ed. A new study published in PLOS ONE, called “Knowing Is Half the Battle: Assessments of Both Student Perception and Performance Are Necessary to Successfully Evaluate Curricular Transformation finds that student resistance to curriculum innovation decreases over time as it becomes the institutional norm, and that students increasingly link active learning to their learning gains over time


    Postgrad pressure

    Research published this year by Vitae and the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) and reported by the Guardian highlights the pressure on post graduate students.

    “They might suffer anxiety about whether they deserve their place at university,” says Sally Wilson, who led IES’s contribution to the research. “Postgraduates can feel as though they are in a vacuum. They don’t know how to structure their time. Many felt they didn’t get support from their supervisor.”

    Taught students tend to fare better than researchers – they enjoy more structure and contact, says Sian Duffin, student support manager at Arden University. But she believes anxiety is on the rise. “The pressure to gain distinction grades is immense,” she says. “Fear of failure can lead to perfectionism, anxiety and depression.”


    Teenagers online in the USA

    According to Pew Internet 95% of teenagers in the USA now report they have a smartphone or access to one. These mobile connections are in turn fueling more-persistent online activities: 45% of teens now say they are online on a near-constant basis.

    Roughly half (51%) of 13 to 17 year olds say they use Facebook, notably lower than the shares who use YouTube, Instagram or Snapchat.

    The survey also finds there is no clear consensus among teens about the effect that social media has on the lives of young people today. Minorities of teens describe that effect as mostly positive (31%) or mostly negative (24%), but the largest share (45%) says that effect has been neither positive nor negative.


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    RT @OwenJones84 Thatcherism encouraged the idea that poverty or hardship weren't social problems, but personal failings. It's that attitude that continues to drive today's onslaught against the welfare state. theguardian.com/commentisfree…

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  • RT @YvetteTaylor0 Sneak preview of illustrated report on student estrangement - coming with me to ⁦@genderanded⁩ conf. @cristinacost#StrathEstrangement pic.twitter.com/vJ9qrkJhTI

    About 13 hours ago from Cristina Costa's Twitter via Twitter for Android

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