GoogleTranslate Service


Exploring my Personal Learning Environment

March 3rd, 2019 by Graham Attwell

vle ple

It has been a bit busy lately. I seem to be writing one report after another. Anyway I got asked ages ago if a I would make a contribution on Personal Learning Environments for a book to be published in Portugal. I couldn’t resist but of course didn’t get my act together until one week past the final deadline. But then, reading the instructions, I forgot that what I had been invited to contribute was a short concept paper. Instead I wrote and activity sheet. Never mind. Here is the activity and you can have the concept piece tomorrow.

 

Title: Exploring my Personal Learning Environment

Objective

The objective of this activity is for participants to explore their own Personal Learning Environment and to reflect on how they learn.

Participants are encouraged to consider:

  • The different contexts in which they learn
  • The people from whom they learn – their Personal Learning network
  • The ways they use technology in their learning
  • The objects which support their learning
  • The links between what they learn and how they use this learning in their practice
  • The reasons they participate in learning activities
  • What inspires them to reflect on learning in their everyday life
  • How they record their learning, who they share that learning with and why?

Target audience

The main target audience is adults. This includes those in full or part time education, those working or those presently unemployed.

Activity time

The activity can be customised according to available time. It could be undertaken in and hour but could also be extended as part of a half day workshop.

Required features

Flexible space for people to work together and to draw posters. Large sheets of flipchart paper. A flipchart. Felt tip pens. A smartphone camera to record the results.


Schematic sequence of steps for activity

  1. An introduction from the facilitator to the idea of Personal Learning Environments, followed by a short discussion.
  2. An introduction to the activity to be undertaken.
  3. Working individually participants draw a view of their own Personal Learning Environments, including institutions, people, social networks and objects from which they learn.
  4. Short presentations of the posters by participants and questions by colleagues.
  5. Discussion and reflections on the outcomes.

Detailed description of steps – up to 800 characters including spaces

The introduction is critical in setting the context for the activity. Many people will conflate learning with formal education: the introduction needs to make clear we are thinking about all kinds of learning and all of the contexts in which learning takes place.

There needs to be no prescription on how they choose to illustrate their PLE. Some may draw elaborate pictures or diagrammes, others may produce a more traditional list or tree diagramme. In one workshop a participant chose to ‘play his PLE’ on a piano! A variety of different presentations enriches the activity.
While drawing the PLE is is an individual activity it is helpful if the working space encourages conversation and co-refection during the activity.

In my experience, most participants are eager to explain their posters – however this can be time consuming. Sometimes I have introduced voting for the best poster – with a small prize.

The final refection and discussion is perhaps the most important part of the activity in drawing out understandings on how we learn and how we can further develop our PLEs.

 

Leave a Reply

  • Search Pontydysgu.org

    News Bites

    Zero Hours Contracts

    Figures from the UK Higher Education Statistics Agency show that in total almost 11,500 people – both academics and support staff – working in universities on a standard basis were on a zero-hours contract in 2017-18, out of a total staff head count of about 430,000, reports the Times Higher Education.  Zero-hours contract means the employer is not obliged to provide any minimum working hours

    Separate figures that only look at the number of people who are employed on “atypical” academic contracts (such as people working on projects) show that 23 per cent of them, or just over 16,000, had a zero-hours contract.


    Resistance decreases over time

    Interesting research on student centered learning and student buy in, as picked up by an article in Inside Higher Ed. A new study published in PLOS ONE, called “Knowing Is Half the Battle: Assessments of Both Student Perception and Performance Are Necessary to Successfully Evaluate Curricular Transformation finds that student resistance to curriculum innovation decreases over time as it becomes the institutional norm, and that students increasingly link active learning to their learning gains over time


    Postgrad pressure

    Research published this year by Vitae and the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) and reported by the Guardian highlights the pressure on post graduate students.

    “They might suffer anxiety about whether they deserve their place at university,” says Sally Wilson, who led IES’s contribution to the research. “Postgraduates can feel as though they are in a vacuum. They don’t know how to structure their time. Many felt they didn’t get support from their supervisor.”

    Taught students tend to fare better than researchers – they enjoy more structure and contact, says Sian Duffin, student support manager at Arden University. But she believes anxiety is on the rise. “The pressure to gain distinction grades is immense,” she says. “Fear of failure can lead to perfectionism, anxiety and depression.”


    Teenagers online in the USA

    According to Pew Internet 95% of teenagers in the USA now report they have a smartphone or access to one. These mobile connections are in turn fueling more-persistent online activities: 45% of teens now say they are online on a near-constant basis.

    Roughly half (51%) of 13 to 17 year olds say they use Facebook, notably lower than the shares who use YouTube, Instagram or Snapchat.

    The survey also finds there is no clear consensus among teens about the effect that social media has on the lives of young people today. Minorities of teens describe that effect as mostly positive (31%) or mostly negative (24%), but the largest share (45%) says that effect has been neither positive nor negative.


    Other Pontydysgu Spaces

    • Pontydysgu on the Web

      pbwiki
      Our Wikispace for teaching and learning
      Sounds of the Bazaar Radio LIVE
      Join our Sounds of the Bazaar Facebook goup. Just click on the logo above.

      We will be at Online Educa Berlin 2015. See the info above. The stream URL to play in your application is Stream URL or go to our new stream webpage here SoB Stream Page.

  • Twitter

    RT @OwenJones84 Thatcherism encouraged the idea that poverty or hardship weren't social problems, but personal failings. It's that attitude that continues to drive today's onslaught against the welfare state. theguardian.com/commentisfree…

    About 11 hours ago from Graham Attwell's Twitter via Tweetbot for Mac

  • RT @YvetteTaylor0 Sneak preview of illustrated report on student estrangement - coming with me to ⁦@genderanded⁩ conf. @cristinacost#StrathEstrangement pic.twitter.com/vJ9qrkJhTI

    Yesterday from Cristina Costa's Twitter via Twitter for Android

  • Sounds of the Bazaar AudioBoo

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • Meta

  • Upcoming Events

      There are no events.
  • Categories